Participate or else! The effect of participation in decision-making in meetings on employee engagement

Michael Yoerger, John Crowe, Joseph A. Allen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the scope of organizational life, few events are as universal or as influential as workplace meetings. In this study, we focused our attention on better understanding the relationship between meetings processes and postmeeting outcomes. More specifically, we investigated the relationship between participation in decision-making (PDM) in meetings and employee engagement, after controlling for the impact of meeting size and other demographic variables. We examined this from a theoretical perspective, providing particular consideration to the underlying basis of social exchange theory and norms of reciprocity at work in this relationship. Using a sample of working adults in the United States who were employees of organizations and attend meetings regularly, we found that PDM in meetings is related to employee engagement, even after controlling for job level, meeting size, tenure, and age. In addition, perceived supervisor support moderates the relationship between PDM in meetings and employee engagement, such that the positive relationship is stronger when perceived supervisor support is high. Further, meeting load also moderates the relationship between PDM in meetings and employee engagement, such that the positive relationship is stronger when meeting load is high. This study is unique in its examination of how characteristics of the meeting setting may influence postmeeting outcomes such as employee engagement. Taken together, the findings suggest that PDM in meetings is associated with employee engagement, under certain conditions that are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)65-80
Number of pages16
JournalConsulting Psychology Journal
Volume67
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015

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Decision Making
Workplace
Demography
Organizations

Keywords

  • Employee engagement
  • Meeting load
  • Meetings
  • Participation in decision-making
  • Perceived supervisor support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychology (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Participate or else! The effect of participation in decision-making in meetings on employee engagement. / Yoerger, Michael; Crowe, John; Allen, Joseph A.

In: Consulting Psychology Journal, Vol. 67, No. 1, 01.03.2015, p. 65-80.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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