Parents do matter, but why? Examining two mediators of the association between parental approval and negative consequences of alcohol use

Erick C. Messler, Aaron A. Lee, Randal P. Quevillon, Raluca M. Simons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

College student drinking is a public health concern with potentially serious consequences. A growing body of literature indicates perceived parental approval of alcohol use is associated with drinking outcomes in college populations, and that parent-based interventions may be a viable way to reduce alcohol use on campus. However, researchers have not yet identified the mechanism responsible for this relationship. In this study, a path model was used to look at the relationship between perceived parental approval of drinking and negative consequences of alcohol use among undergraduate students (N = 632) via two mechanisms: perceived friends approval of drinking and perceived parental monitoring. The path model specified in this study indicated that perceived parental approval of drinking is associated with negative consequences of alcohol use, and that this effect is not fully attributed to perceived parental monitoring, injunctive norms of friends, gender or weekly alcohol consumption. As hypothesized, perceived friends approval of drinking partially mediated the relationship between perceived parental approval of drinking and negative consequences of alcohol use. Contrary to hypothesis, the path model did not provide support to the mediating role of perceived parental monitoring.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)179-184
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Substance Use
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 3 2016

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Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • college students
  • harm reduction
  • health
  • monitoring
  • parental approval of drinking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)

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