Parents’ and children’s violent gameplay: role of co-playing

Doug Walker, E. Deanne Brocato, Les Carlson, Russell N. Laczniak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore the role of co-playing as a moderator of the relation between parents’ and children’s play of violent video games. Design/methodology/approach: The study uses dyadic parent/child survey data to estimate the conditional effects in the model, both direct and indirect. Findings: The positive effect of parents’ violent video game play of children’s playing behaviors is attenuated by parent/child co-playing. Parents’ knowledge of the Entertainment Software Rating Board (ESRB) ratings leads to higher levels of co-playing, thereby indirectly attenuating violent video game play in children as driven by parents’ play. Research limitations/implications: The paper extends the literature on consumer socialization and the impact of co-playing and identifies an antecedent for co-playing in this context. Practical implications: The paper reveals that knowledge of the self-regulatory ESRB rules plays a valuable (indirect) role in mitigating violent video game play by children through an increase in co-playing, which attenuates the positive effect of parents’ play on children’s play. Originality/value: The study incorporates data from both parents and children to investigate the relationship between parents and children’s violent video game play while empirically investigating the uncertainty in the literature concerning the moderating impact of co-playing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)623-632
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Consumer Marketing
Volume35
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 10 2018

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Video games
Rating
Software
Entertainment
Consumer socialization
Moderator
Uncertainty
Design methodology
Survey data

Keywords

  • Children
  • Co-playing
  • Consumer socialization
  • Parents
  • Violent video games

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Marketing

Cite this

Parents’ and children’s violent gameplay : role of co-playing. / Walker, Doug; Brocato, E. Deanne; Carlson, Les; Laczniak, Russell N.

In: Journal of Consumer Marketing, Vol. 35, No. 6, 10.09.2018, p. 623-632.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Walker, Doug ; Brocato, E. Deanne ; Carlson, Les ; Laczniak, Russell N. / Parents’ and children’s violent gameplay : role of co-playing. In: Journal of Consumer Marketing. 2018 ; Vol. 35, No. 6. pp. 623-632.
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