Parenteral nutrition additive shortages: The short-term, long-term and potential epigenetic implications in premature and hospitalized infants

Corrine K Hanson, Melissa Thoene, Julie Wagner, Dean S Collier, Kassandra Lecci, Ann L Anderson Berry

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nutrition support practitioners are currently dealing with shortages of parenteral nutrition micronutrients, including multivitamins (MVI), selenium and zinc. A recent survey from the American Society of Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition (ASPEN) indicates that this shortage is having a profound effect on clinical practice. A majority of respondents reported taking some aggressive measures to ration existing supplies. Most premature infants and many infants with congenital anomalies are dependent on parenteral nutrition for the first weeks of life to meet nutritional needs. Because of fragile health and poor reserves, they are uniquely susceptible to this problem. It should be understood that shortages and rationing have been associated with adverse outcomes, such as lactic acidosis and Wernicke encephalopathy from thiamine deficiency or pulmonary and skeletal development concerns related to inadequate stores of Vitamin A and D. In this review, we will discuss the current parenteral shortages and the possible impact on a population of very low birth weight infants. This review will also present a case study of a neonate who was impacted by these current shortages.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1977-1988
Number of pages12
JournalNutrients
Volume4
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2012

Fingerprint

Parenteral Nutrition
parenteral feeding
Epigenomics
Premature Infants
epigenetics
Wernicke Encephalopathy
Thiamine Deficiency
Lactic Acidosis
Very Low Birth Weight Infant
encephalopathy
skeletal development
low birth weight
Micronutrients
enteral feeding
Enteral Nutrition
acidosis
Selenium
vitamin D
thiamin
Vitamin A

Keywords

  • Neonate
  • Nutrient deficiencies
  • Premature infant
  • TPN

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Parenteral nutrition additive shortages : The short-term, long-term and potential epigenetic implications in premature and hospitalized infants. / Hanson, Corrine K; Thoene, Melissa; Wagner, Julie; Collier, Dean S; Lecci, Kassandra; Anderson Berry, Ann L.

In: Nutrients, Vol. 4, No. 12, 12.2012, p. 1977-1988.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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