Parent involvement and views of school success: The role of parents' Latino and white American cultural orientations

Carey S. Ryan, Juan F. Casas, Lisa Kelly-Vance, Brigette O. Ryalls, Collette Nero

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined ethnicity and cultural orientation as predictors of parents' views of and involvement in children's education, using data gathered from the Latino (n = 74) and non-Latino (17 White and 13 ethnic minority) parents of children in an elementary school's dual-language program. Parents completed a questionnaire that assessed Latino and White American cultural orientations, importance of children's academic and social success, and self- and significant other involvement in children's education. Results indicated that Latino (and other ethnic minority) parents valued academic and social success equally and more strongly than did Whites and that Whites valued social success more strongly than academic success. Latinos also reported greater involvement of significant others. These differences were largely accounted for by cultural orientations. Educational practices that take into account differences in cultural orientations and the involvement of significant others thus seem more likely to improve academic outcomes than do efforts intended to promote the valuing of education.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)391-405
Number of pages15
JournalPsychology in the Schools
Volume47
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2010

Fingerprint

school success
Hispanic Americans
parents
Parents
child education
Education
national minority
academic success
educational practice
elementary school
Language
ethnicity
questionnaire
language
education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Parent involvement and views of school success : The role of parents' Latino and white American cultural orientations. / Ryan, Carey S.; Casas, Juan F.; Kelly-Vance, Lisa; Ryalls, Brigette O.; Nero, Collette.

In: Psychology in the Schools, Vol. 47, No. 4, 01.04.2010, p. 391-405.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ryan, Carey S. ; Casas, Juan F. ; Kelly-Vance, Lisa ; Ryalls, Brigette O. ; Nero, Collette. / Parent involvement and views of school success : The role of parents' Latino and white American cultural orientations. In: Psychology in the Schools. 2010 ; Vol. 47, No. 4. pp. 391-405.
@article{c5d71a046d7d4ef1a8f5e78ef606d6d3,
title = "Parent involvement and views of school success: The role of parents' Latino and white American cultural orientations",
abstract = "We examined ethnicity and cultural orientation as predictors of parents' views of and involvement in children's education, using data gathered from the Latino (n = 74) and non-Latino (17 White and 13 ethnic minority) parents of children in an elementary school's dual-language program. Parents completed a questionnaire that assessed Latino and White American cultural orientations, importance of children's academic and social success, and self- and significant other involvement in children's education. Results indicated that Latino (and other ethnic minority) parents valued academic and social success equally and more strongly than did Whites and that Whites valued social success more strongly than academic success. Latinos also reported greater involvement of significant others. These differences were largely accounted for by cultural orientations. Educational practices that take into account differences in cultural orientations and the involvement of significant others thus seem more likely to improve academic outcomes than do efforts intended to promote the valuing of education.",
author = "Ryan, {Carey S.} and Casas, {Juan F.} and Lisa Kelly-Vance and Ryalls, {Brigette O.} and Collette Nero",
year = "2010",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/pits.20477",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "47",
pages = "391--405",
journal = "Psychology in the Schools",
issn = "0033-3085",
publisher = "Wiley-Liss Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Parent involvement and views of school success

T2 - The role of parents' Latino and white American cultural orientations

AU - Ryan, Carey S.

AU - Casas, Juan F.

AU - Kelly-Vance, Lisa

AU - Ryalls, Brigette O.

AU - Nero, Collette

PY - 2010/4/1

Y1 - 2010/4/1

N2 - We examined ethnicity and cultural orientation as predictors of parents' views of and involvement in children's education, using data gathered from the Latino (n = 74) and non-Latino (17 White and 13 ethnic minority) parents of children in an elementary school's dual-language program. Parents completed a questionnaire that assessed Latino and White American cultural orientations, importance of children's academic and social success, and self- and significant other involvement in children's education. Results indicated that Latino (and other ethnic minority) parents valued academic and social success equally and more strongly than did Whites and that Whites valued social success more strongly than academic success. Latinos also reported greater involvement of significant others. These differences were largely accounted for by cultural orientations. Educational practices that take into account differences in cultural orientations and the involvement of significant others thus seem more likely to improve academic outcomes than do efforts intended to promote the valuing of education.

AB - We examined ethnicity and cultural orientation as predictors of parents' views of and involvement in children's education, using data gathered from the Latino (n = 74) and non-Latino (17 White and 13 ethnic minority) parents of children in an elementary school's dual-language program. Parents completed a questionnaire that assessed Latino and White American cultural orientations, importance of children's academic and social success, and self- and significant other involvement in children's education. Results indicated that Latino (and other ethnic minority) parents valued academic and social success equally and more strongly than did Whites and that Whites valued social success more strongly than academic success. Latinos also reported greater involvement of significant others. These differences were largely accounted for by cultural orientations. Educational practices that take into account differences in cultural orientations and the involvement of significant others thus seem more likely to improve academic outcomes than do efforts intended to promote the valuing of education.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77955603942&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77955603942&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/pits.20477

DO - 10.1002/pits.20477

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:77955603942

VL - 47

SP - 391

EP - 405

JO - Psychology in the Schools

JF - Psychology in the Schools

SN - 0033-3085

IS - 4

ER -