Parasites as probes for biodiversity

S. L. Gardner, M. L. Campbell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cestodes of the genus Linstowia, parasitic in marsupials, show patterns of coevolution and ancient historical-ecological connections. Correlated with the breakup of the austral landmasses (Gondwanaland) of the Neotropical and Australian regions from the Antarctic continent, the age of this host- parasite community is estimated to be between 60 and 70 million years old. Based on the data from the survey of parasites of mammals from throughout Bolivia and from the phylogenetic analysis of the cestodes, we urge the planners of biodiversity preserves in the neotropics to consider the Yungas of Bolivia as a region that supports an ancient ecological community worthy of consideration as a biopreserve.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)596-600
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Parasitology
Volume78
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

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Bolivia
Cestoda
Biodiversity
Antarctic Regions
parasite
Parasites
probe
biodiversity
Neotropical Region
parasites
Australian Region
Marsupialia
Biota
marsupial
coevolution
Metatheria
preserves
Mammals
mammal
mammals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Parasites as probes for biodiversity. / Gardner, S. L.; Campbell, M. L.

In: Journal of Parasitology, Vol. 78, No. 4, 01.01.1992, p. 596-600.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gardner, S. L. ; Campbell, M. L. / Parasites as probes for biodiversity. In: Journal of Parasitology. 1992 ; Vol. 78, No. 4. pp. 596-600.
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