Oxygen matters

Tissue culture oxygen levels affect mitochondrial function and structure as well as responses to HIV viroproteins

L. M. Tiede, E. A. Cook, B. Morsey, Howard S Fox

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mitochondrial dysfunction is implicated in a majority of neurodegenerative disorders and much study of neurodegenerative disease is done on cultured neurons. In traditional tissue culture, the oxygen level that cells experience is dramatically higher (21%) than in vivo conditions (1-11%). These differences can alter experimental results, especially, pertaining to mitochondria and oxidative metabolism. Our results show that primary neurons cultured at physiological oxygen levels found in the brain showed higher polarization, lower rates of ROS production, larger mitochondrial networks, greater cytoplasmic fractions of mitochondria and larger mitochondrial perimeters than those cultured at higher oxygen levels. Although neurons cultured in either physiological oxygen or atmospheric oxygen exhibit significant increases in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production when treated with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) virotoxin trans-activator of transcription, mitochondria of neurons cultured at physiological oxygen underwent depolarization with dramatically increased cell death, whereas those cultured at atmospheric oxygen became hyperpolarized with no increase in cell death. Studies with a second HIV virotoxin, negative regulation factor (Nef), revealed that Nef treatment also increased mitochondrial ROS production for both the oxygen conditions, but resulted in mitochondrial depolarization and increased death only in neurons cultured in physiological oxygen. These results indicate a role for oxidative metabolism in a mechanism of neurotoxicity during HIV infection and demonstrate the importance of choosing the correct, physiological, culture oxygen in mitochondrial studies performed in neurons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere246
JournalCell Death and Disease
Volume2
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011

Fingerprint

HIV
Oxygen
Neurons
Reactive Oxygen Species
Mitochondria
Neurodegenerative Diseases
Cell Death
Trans-Activators
Virus Diseases
Brain

Keywords

  • Culture oxygen
  • HIV
  • Mitochondria
  • Neurodegeneration
  • Neurons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Cell Biology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Oxygen matters : Tissue culture oxygen levels affect mitochondrial function and structure as well as responses to HIV viroproteins. / Tiede, L. M.; Cook, E. A.; Morsey, B.; Fox, Howard S.

In: Cell Death and Disease, Vol. 2, No. 12, e246, 01.12.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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