Ovarian cancer incidence in the United States in relation to manufacturing industry

Gary G. Schwartz, Abe E. Sahmoun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Ovarian cancer is primarily a disease of the industrialized world. However, few factors associated with industrialization that contribute to the etiology of ovarian cancer have been identified. We sought to explore factors potentially associated with ovarian cancer by correlating ovarian cancer incidence rates in US states with the distribution of US manufacturing. Methods: Data on age-adjusted incidence rates for ovarian cancer per state in the United States and manufacturing rates per state were analyzed using multiple linear regression controlling for access to ovarian cancer care, fertility rate, and other potential confounders. Results: In univariate analyses, ovarian cancer incidence rates were positively correlated with the extent of manufacturing, with dairy production, and with the manufacturing of pulp and paper. Using multiple linear regression, only the correlation of ovarian cancer with pulp and paper manufacturing industry was significant. The correlation of ovarian cancer with pulp and paper manufacturing industry remained significant after adjusting for access to ovarian cancer care, fertility rates, and other potential confounders (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Pulp and paper mills are associated with exposures to known ovarian carcinogens. Further epidemiological study of exposures involved in the manufacturing of pulp and paper in relation to risk of ovarian cancer is warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)247-251
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Gynecological Cancer
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Ovarian Neoplasms
Incidence
Birth Rate
Linear Models
Manufacturing Industry
Carcinogens
Epidemiologic Studies

Keywords

  • Ecological study
  • Etiology
  • Manufacturing
  • Ovarian cancer
  • Pulp and paper

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Ovarian cancer incidence in the United States in relation to manufacturing industry. / Schwartz, Gary G.; Sahmoun, Abe E.

In: International Journal of Gynecological Cancer, Vol. 24, No. 2, 01.01.2014, p. 247-251.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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