Outcomes of a multifaceted physical activity regimen as part of a diabetes self-management intervention

Diane K. King, Paul A. Estabrooks, Lisa A. Strycker, Deborah J. Toobert, Sheana S. Bull, Russell E. Glasgow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Physical activity (PA) is important for management of diabetes, yet practical interventions that achieve sustained behavior change are rare. Purpose: The goals of this research were to evaluate the effectiveness of a multifaceted PA intervention for people with type 2 diabetes that emphasized participant choice in activity selection. Baseline activity patterns were examined to determine whether they predicted changes in PA at 2 months. Methods: Three hundred thirty-five participants were recruited from 42 primary care physicians and then randomized to either a computer-assisted, tailored self-management intervention (N = 174) or health risk appraisal with feedback control (N = 161). Primary outcome measures included the Community Healthy Activities Model Program for Seniors Questionnaire, diet, and psychosocial assessments at baseline and 2 months. Results: For 301 participants who completed the 2-month follow-up, the intervention significantly improved all PA (p < .01) and moderate PA (metabolic equivalents > 3.0, p < .01) relative to controls. Baseline cluster analyses grouped participant activity patterns into three categories. At 2 months, cluster assignment differentially predicted change in calories expended in moderate, rote, sport, and lifestyle PA. Conclusions: A computer-assisted, multifaceted approach to PA demonstrated improvement after 2 months. The results suggest that individuals are capable of adjusting their activity patterns to maximize their PA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)128-137
Number of pages10
JournalAnnals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 10 2006

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Self Care
Exercise
Health Status Indicators
Primary Care Physicians
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Sports
Cluster Analysis
Life Style
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Diet
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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Outcomes of a multifaceted physical activity regimen as part of a diabetes self-management intervention. / King, Diane K.; Estabrooks, Paul A.; Strycker, Lisa A.; Toobert, Deborah J.; Bull, Sheana S.; Glasgow, Russell E.

In: Annals of Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 31, No. 2, 10.04.2006, p. 128-137.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

King, Diane K. ; Estabrooks, Paul A. ; Strycker, Lisa A. ; Toobert, Deborah J. ; Bull, Sheana S. ; Glasgow, Russell E. / Outcomes of a multifaceted physical activity regimen as part of a diabetes self-management intervention. In: Annals of Behavioral Medicine. 2006 ; Vol. 31, No. 2. pp. 128-137.
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