Orthopaedic injuries in child abuse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Child abuse is a clinical diagnosis, made on the basis of a thorough history and physical exam, with radiographic studies as indicated. A multi-disciplinary approach can aid in diagnosis. Fractures are the second most common manifestation of abuse, and between 30% and 50% of victims will require the services of an orthopaedic surgeon. Familiarity with the list of high- and low-specificity fractures for abuse is useful, as is knowledge of the differential diagnosis. Fractures secondary to abuse generally have a good outcome and long-term prognosis. Appropriate referrals and intervention can decrease risk of future abuse.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)199-204
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Paediatrics
Volume16
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2006

Fingerprint

Child Abuse
Orthopedics
Wounds and Injuries
Differential Diagnosis
Referral and Consultation
History
Orthopedic Surgeons
Recognition (Psychology)

Keywords

  • Child abuse
  • Fractures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Orthopaedic injuries in child abuse. / Scherl, Susan A.

In: Current Paediatrics, Vol. 16, No. 3, 01.06.2006, p. 199-204.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Scherl, Susan A. / Orthopaedic injuries in child abuse. In: Current Paediatrics. 2006 ; Vol. 16, No. 3. pp. 199-204.
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