Orofacial fine motor control impairments in congenital spasticity: Evidence against hypertonus-related performance deficits

Steven M. Barlow, James H. Abbs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Motor impairments in the fine force control of lips, tongue, and jaw were measured in subjects with congenital spasticity. Because these orofacial motor systems are not uniformly endowed with muscle spindles and monosynaptic reflexes, quantification of these motor impairments addresses the question of whether stretch reflex hypertonus is a positive or negative sign. The results indicated that hyperactive muscle spindle-based monosynaptic reflexes are not a causal factor in these voluntary orofacial motor impairments. These data also indicated that motor impairments were disproportionately greater at finer levels of isometric force control. These fine control measures appear useful as a quantitative index of general voluntary motor deficit.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)145-150
Number of pages6
JournalNeurology
Volume34
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 1984

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Monosynaptic Reflex
Muscle Spindles
Stretch Reflex
Lip
Jaw
Tongue
Motor Control
Impairment
Reflex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Orofacial fine motor control impairments in congenital spasticity : Evidence against hypertonus-related performance deficits. / Barlow, Steven M.; Abbs, James H.

In: Neurology, Vol. 34, No. 2, 02.1984, p. 145-150.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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