Oral carnitine therapy in children with cystinosis and renal Fanconi syndrome

W. A. Gahl, I. Bernardini, M. Dalakas, W. B. Rizzo, G. S. Harper, J. M. Hoeg, O. Hurko, J. Bernar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

11 children with either cystinosis or Lowe's syndrome had a reduced content of plasma and muscle carnitine due to renal Fanconi syndrome. After treatment with oral L-carnitine, 100 mg/kg per d divided every 6 h, plasma carnitine concentrations became normal in all subjects within 2 d. Initial plasma free fatty acid concentrations, inversely related to free carnitine concentrations, were reduced after 7-20 mo of carnitine therapy. Muscle lipid accumulation, which varied directly with duration of carnitine deficiency (r = 0.73), improved significantly in three of seven rebiopsied patients after carnitine therapy. One Lowe's syndrome patient achieved a normal muscle carnitine level after therapy. Muscle carnitine levels remained low in all cystinosis patients, even though cystinotic muscle cells in culture took up L-[3H]carnitine normally. The half-life of plasma carnitine for cystinotic children given a single oral dose approximated 6.3 h; 14% of ingested L-carnitine was excreted within 24 h. Studies in a uremic patient with cytinosis showed that her plasma carnitine was in equilibrium with some larger compartment and may have been maintained by release of carnitine from the muscle during dialysis. Because oral L-carnitine corrects plasma carnitine deficiency, lowers plasma free fatty acid concentrations, and reverses muscle lipid accumulation in some patients, its use as therapy in renal Fanconi syndrome should be considered. However, its efficacy in restoring muscle carnitine to normal, and the optimal dosage regimen, have yet to be determined.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)549-560
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Clinical Investigation
Volume81
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988

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Cystinosis
Fanconi Syndrome
Carnitine
Therapeutics
Muscles
Oculocerebrorenal Syndrome
Nonesterified Fatty Acids
Lipids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Gahl, W. A., Bernardini, I., Dalakas, M., Rizzo, W. B., Harper, G. S., Hoeg, J. M., ... Bernar, J. (1988). Oral carnitine therapy in children with cystinosis and renal Fanconi syndrome. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 81(2), 549-560. https://doi.org/10.1172/JCI113353

Oral carnitine therapy in children with cystinosis and renal Fanconi syndrome. / Gahl, W. A.; Bernardini, I.; Dalakas, M.; Rizzo, W. B.; Harper, G. S.; Hoeg, J. M.; Hurko, O.; Bernar, J.

In: Journal of Clinical Investigation, Vol. 81, No. 2, 01.01.1988, p. 549-560.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gahl, WA, Bernardini, I, Dalakas, M, Rizzo, WB, Harper, GS, Hoeg, JM, Hurko, O & Bernar, J 1988, 'Oral carnitine therapy in children with cystinosis and renal Fanconi syndrome', Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol. 81, no. 2, pp. 549-560. https://doi.org/10.1172/JCI113353
Gahl, W. A. ; Bernardini, I. ; Dalakas, M. ; Rizzo, W. B. ; Harper, G. S. ; Hoeg, J. M. ; Hurko, O. ; Bernar, J. / Oral carnitine therapy in children with cystinosis and renal Fanconi syndrome. In: Journal of Clinical Investigation. 1988 ; Vol. 81, No. 2. pp. 549-560.
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