Optical fiber-based chemical sensors for detection of corrosion precursors and by-products

Jennifer Elster, Jonathan Greene, Mark Jones, Tim Bailey, Shannon Lenahan, William H Velander, Roger VanTassell, William Hodges, Ignacio Perez

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Optical fiber sensors are a novel and ideal approach for making chemical and physical measurements in a variety of harsh environments. They do not corrode, are resistant to most chemicals, immune to electromagnetic interference, light weight, inherently small and have a flexible geometry. This paper presents recent test results using optical fiber long-period grating (LPG) sensors to monitor corrosion precursors and by-products. With the appropriate coating, the LPG sensor can be designed to identify a variety of environmental target molecules, such as moisture, pH, sulfates, chlorates, nitrates and metal-ions in otherwise inaccessible regions of metallic structures. Detection of these chemicals can be used to determine if the environment within a particular area of an airplane or infrastructure is becoming conducive to corrosion or whether the corrosion process is active. The LPG sensors offer a clear advantage over similar electrochemical sensors since they can be rendered immune to temperature cross-sensitivity, multiplexed along a single fiber, and can be demodulated using a simple, low-cost spectrum analyzer. By coating the LPG sensor with specially designed affinity coatings that selectively absorb target molecules, selective, real-time monitoring of environmental conditions is possible. This sensing platform shows great promise for corrosion by-product detection in pipe networks, civil infrastructure, process control, and petroleum production operations and can be applied as biological sensors for in-vitro detection of pathogens, and chemical sensors for environmental and industrial process monitoring.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)251-257
Number of pages7
JournalProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume3540
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

Fingerprint

Chemical Sensor
Corrosion
Chemical sensors
Precursor
Optical Fiber
Long Period Grating
Byproducts
Optical fibers
corrosion
optical fibers
Sensor
sensors
Sensors
Coating
Coatings
gratings
Chlorates
Infrastructure
Spectrum analyzers
Electrochemical sensors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Optical fiber-based chemical sensors for detection of corrosion precursors and by-products. / Elster, Jennifer; Greene, Jonathan; Jones, Mark; Bailey, Tim; Lenahan, Shannon; Velander, William H; VanTassell, Roger; Hodges, William; Perez, Ignacio.

In: Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, Vol. 3540, 01.01.1999, p. 251-257.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Elster, J, Greene, J, Jones, M, Bailey, T, Lenahan, S, Velander, WH, VanTassell, R, Hodges, W & Perez, I 1999, 'Optical fiber-based chemical sensors for detection of corrosion precursors and by-products', Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, vol. 3540, pp. 251-257.
Elster, Jennifer ; Greene, Jonathan ; Jones, Mark ; Bailey, Tim ; Lenahan, Shannon ; Velander, William H ; VanTassell, Roger ; Hodges, William ; Perez, Ignacio. / Optical fiber-based chemical sensors for detection of corrosion precursors and by-products. In: Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. 1999 ; Vol. 3540. pp. 251-257.
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