Onset of catatonia at puberty: Electroconvulsive therapy response in two autistic adolescents

Neera Ghaziuddin, Daniel Gih, Virginia Barbosa, Daniel F. Maixner, Mohammad Ghaziuddin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Catatonia is a syndrome of motor and behavioral disturbance. It is a poorly understood condition, which is underrecognized and may go untreated despite intensive medical workup and numerous unsuccessful medication trials. However, with treatments known to be effective, such as benzodiazepines and/or electroconvulsive therapy, patients may return to their baseline functioning. Autism and catatonia have been previously reported together. We report 2 patients with autism and mental retardation who developed catatonic symptoms at the onset of puberty. Both patients experienced persistent symptoms over several years and presented with a history of motor disturbance, functional decline, and episodic aggression. Both patients were treated with electroconvulsive therapy resulting in a positive response and functional improvement. Catatonia may persist as a chronic condition, lasting over several months or years, if not recognized and treated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)274-277
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of ECT
Volume26
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010

Fingerprint

Catatonia
Electroconvulsive Therapy
Puberty
Autistic Disorder
Aggression
Benzodiazepines
Intellectual Disability

Keywords

  • ECT
  • autism
  • catatonia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Onset of catatonia at puberty : Electroconvulsive therapy response in two autistic adolescents. / Ghaziuddin, Neera; Gih, Daniel; Barbosa, Virginia; Maixner, Daniel F.; Ghaziuddin, Mohammad.

In: Journal of ECT, Vol. 26, No. 4, 01.12.2010, p. 274-277.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ghaziuddin, Neera ; Gih, Daniel ; Barbosa, Virginia ; Maixner, Daniel F. ; Ghaziuddin, Mohammad. / Onset of catatonia at puberty : Electroconvulsive therapy response in two autistic adolescents. In: Journal of ECT. 2010 ; Vol. 26, No. 4. pp. 274-277.
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