Onset of alcohol or substance use disorders following treatment for adolescent depression

John Curry, Susan Silva, Paul Rohde, Golda Ginsburg, Betsy Kennard, Christopher J Kratochvil, Anne Simons, Jerry Kirchner, Diane May, Taryn Mayes, Norah Feeny, Anne Marie Albano, Sarah Lavanier, Mark Reinecke, Rachel Jacobs, Emily Becker-Weidman, Elizabeth Weller, Graham Emslie, John Walkup, Elizabeth KastelicBarbara Burns, Karen Wells, John March

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study tested whether positive response to short-term treatment for adolescent major depressive disorder (MDD) would have the secondary benefit of preventing subsequent alcohol use disorders (AUD) or substance use disorders (SUD). Method: For 5 years, we followed 192 adolescents (56.2% female; 20.8% minority) who had participated in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS; TADS Team, 2004) and who had no prior diagnoses of AUD or SUD. TADS initial treatments were cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), fluoxetine alone (FLX), the combination of CBT and FLX (COMB), or clinical management with pill placebo (PBO). We used both the original TADS treatment response rating and a more restrictive symptom count rating. During follow-up, diagnostic interviews were completed at 6-or 12-month intervals to assess onset of AUD or SUD as well as MDD recovery and recurrence. Results: Achieving a positive response to MDD treatment was unrelated to subsequent AUD but predicted a lower rate of subsequent SUD, regardless of the measure of positive response (11.65% vs. 24.72%, or 10.0% vs. 24.5%, respectively). Type of initial MDD treatment was not related to either outcome. Prior to depression treatment, greater involvement with alcohol or drugs predicted later AUD or SUD, as did older age (for AUD) and more comorbid disorders (for SUD). Among those with recurrent MDD and AUD, AUD preceded MDD recurrence in 24 of 25 cases. Conclusion: Effective short-term adolescent depression treatment significantly reduces the rate of subsequent SUD but not AUD. Alcohol or drug use should be assessed prior to adolescent MDD treatment and monitored even after MDD recovery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)299-312
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume80
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2012

Fingerprint

Substance-Related Disorders
Major Depressive Disorder
Alcohols
Depression
Therapeutics
Fluoxetine
Cognitive Therapy
Substance Use
Alcohol
Onset
Recurrence
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Placebos
Interviews

Keywords

  • adolescents
  • alcohol use disorders
  • major depression
  • substance use disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Onset of alcohol or substance use disorders following treatment for adolescent depression. / Curry, John; Silva, Susan; Rohde, Paul; Ginsburg, Golda; Kennard, Betsy; Kratochvil, Christopher J; Simons, Anne; Kirchner, Jerry; May, Diane; Mayes, Taryn; Feeny, Norah; Albano, Anne Marie; Lavanier, Sarah; Reinecke, Mark; Jacobs, Rachel; Becker-Weidman, Emily; Weller, Elizabeth; Emslie, Graham; Walkup, John; Kastelic, Elizabeth; Burns, Barbara; Wells, Karen; March, John.

In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol. 80, No. 2, 01.04.2012, p. 299-312.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Curry, J, Silva, S, Rohde, P, Ginsburg, G, Kennard, B, Kratochvil, CJ, Simons, A, Kirchner, J, May, D, Mayes, T, Feeny, N, Albano, AM, Lavanier, S, Reinecke, M, Jacobs, R, Becker-Weidman, E, Weller, E, Emslie, G, Walkup, J, Kastelic, E, Burns, B, Wells, K & March, J 2012, 'Onset of alcohol or substance use disorders following treatment for adolescent depression', Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, vol. 80, no. 2, pp. 299-312. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0026929
Curry, John ; Silva, Susan ; Rohde, Paul ; Ginsburg, Golda ; Kennard, Betsy ; Kratochvil, Christopher J ; Simons, Anne ; Kirchner, Jerry ; May, Diane ; Mayes, Taryn ; Feeny, Norah ; Albano, Anne Marie ; Lavanier, Sarah ; Reinecke, Mark ; Jacobs, Rachel ; Becker-Weidman, Emily ; Weller, Elizabeth ; Emslie, Graham ; Walkup, John ; Kastelic, Elizabeth ; Burns, Barbara ; Wells, Karen ; March, John. / Onset of alcohol or substance use disorders following treatment for adolescent depression. In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. 2012 ; Vol. 80, No. 2. pp. 299-312.
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abstract = "Objective: This study tested whether positive response to short-term treatment for adolescent major depressive disorder (MDD) would have the secondary benefit of preventing subsequent alcohol use disorders (AUD) or substance use disorders (SUD). Method: For 5 years, we followed 192 adolescents (56.2{\%} female; 20.8{\%} minority) who had participated in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS; TADS Team, 2004) and who had no prior diagnoses of AUD or SUD. TADS initial treatments were cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), fluoxetine alone (FLX), the combination of CBT and FLX (COMB), or clinical management with pill placebo (PBO). We used both the original TADS treatment response rating and a more restrictive symptom count rating. During follow-up, diagnostic interviews were completed at 6-or 12-month intervals to assess onset of AUD or SUD as well as MDD recovery and recurrence. Results: Achieving a positive response to MDD treatment was unrelated to subsequent AUD but predicted a lower rate of subsequent SUD, regardless of the measure of positive response (11.65{\%} vs. 24.72{\%}, or 10.0{\%} vs. 24.5{\%}, respectively). Type of initial MDD treatment was not related to either outcome. Prior to depression treatment, greater involvement with alcohol or drugs predicted later AUD or SUD, as did older age (for AUD) and more comorbid disorders (for SUD). Among those with recurrent MDD and AUD, AUD preceded MDD recurrence in 24 of 25 cases. Conclusion: Effective short-term adolescent depression treatment significantly reduces the rate of subsequent SUD but not AUD. Alcohol or drug use should be assessed prior to adolescent MDD treatment and monitored even after MDD recovery.",
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AU - Rohde, Paul

AU - Ginsburg, Golda

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AU - Kratochvil, Christopher J

AU - Simons, Anne

AU - Kirchner, Jerry

AU - May, Diane

AU - Mayes, Taryn

AU - Feeny, Norah

AU - Albano, Anne Marie

AU - Lavanier, Sarah

AU - Reinecke, Mark

AU - Jacobs, Rachel

AU - Becker-Weidman, Emily

AU - Weller, Elizabeth

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N2 - Objective: This study tested whether positive response to short-term treatment for adolescent major depressive disorder (MDD) would have the secondary benefit of preventing subsequent alcohol use disorders (AUD) or substance use disorders (SUD). Method: For 5 years, we followed 192 adolescents (56.2% female; 20.8% minority) who had participated in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS; TADS Team, 2004) and who had no prior diagnoses of AUD or SUD. TADS initial treatments were cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), fluoxetine alone (FLX), the combination of CBT and FLX (COMB), or clinical management with pill placebo (PBO). We used both the original TADS treatment response rating and a more restrictive symptom count rating. During follow-up, diagnostic interviews were completed at 6-or 12-month intervals to assess onset of AUD or SUD as well as MDD recovery and recurrence. Results: Achieving a positive response to MDD treatment was unrelated to subsequent AUD but predicted a lower rate of subsequent SUD, regardless of the measure of positive response (11.65% vs. 24.72%, or 10.0% vs. 24.5%, respectively). Type of initial MDD treatment was not related to either outcome. Prior to depression treatment, greater involvement with alcohol or drugs predicted later AUD or SUD, as did older age (for AUD) and more comorbid disorders (for SUD). Among those with recurrent MDD and AUD, AUD preceded MDD recurrence in 24 of 25 cases. Conclusion: Effective short-term adolescent depression treatment significantly reduces the rate of subsequent SUD but not AUD. Alcohol or drug use should be assessed prior to adolescent MDD treatment and monitored even after MDD recovery.

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