Ongoing reciprocal teacher-student interactions involving disruptive behaviors in general education classrooms

James R Nelson, Maura L. Roberts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article presents the results of a 3-year study designed to detail the ongoing reciprocal sequence of interactions between teachers and students around disruptive behaviors in general education classrooms. The ongoing reciprocal interactions of teachers and 99 target students (i.e., those who exhibited high rates and/or severe forms of disruptive behavior) and 278 criterion students (i.e., those who did not exhibit disruptive behaviors or other behavioral adjustment problems) regarding disruptive behaviors were observed in general education classrooms. The results revealed that there were no differences in the relative occurrences of disruptive behaviors of target and criterion students across a wide range of ecological contexts. In addition, the disruptive behaviors of target students appeared to be somewhat unstoppable relative to criterion students, and the ongoing reciprocal interaction behaviors of both teachers and students remained constant over time. Teachers, however, were more likely to respond negatively to the disruptive behaviors of target students than to those of criterion students. The results and their implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)27-48
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders
Volume8
Issue number1
StatePublished - Mar 1 2000

Fingerprint

general education
student teacher
Students
Education
classroom
interaction
student
teacher
interaction behavior
Social Adjustment
Problem Behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Ongoing reciprocal teacher-student interactions involving disruptive behaviors in general education classrooms. / Nelson, James R; Roberts, Maura L.

In: Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders, Vol. 8, No. 1, 01.03.2000, p. 27-48.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e84fce6f17be4b50809f34c7b3f7f964,
title = "Ongoing reciprocal teacher-student interactions involving disruptive behaviors in general education classrooms",
abstract = "This article presents the results of a 3-year study designed to detail the ongoing reciprocal sequence of interactions between teachers and students around disruptive behaviors in general education classrooms. The ongoing reciprocal interactions of teachers and 99 target students (i.e., those who exhibited high rates and/or severe forms of disruptive behavior) and 278 criterion students (i.e., those who did not exhibit disruptive behaviors or other behavioral adjustment problems) regarding disruptive behaviors were observed in general education classrooms. The results revealed that there were no differences in the relative occurrences of disruptive behaviors of target and criterion students across a wide range of ecological contexts. In addition, the disruptive behaviors of target students appeared to be somewhat unstoppable relative to criterion students, and the ongoing reciprocal interaction behaviors of both teachers and students remained constant over time. Teachers, however, were more likely to respond negatively to the disruptive behaviors of target students than to those of criterion students. The results and their implications are discussed.",
author = "Nelson, {James R} and Roberts, {Maura L.}",
year = "2000",
month = "3",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "8",
pages = "27--48",
journal = "Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders",
issn = "1063-4266",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ongoing reciprocal teacher-student interactions involving disruptive behaviors in general education classrooms

AU - Nelson, James R

AU - Roberts, Maura L.

PY - 2000/3/1

Y1 - 2000/3/1

N2 - This article presents the results of a 3-year study designed to detail the ongoing reciprocal sequence of interactions between teachers and students around disruptive behaviors in general education classrooms. The ongoing reciprocal interactions of teachers and 99 target students (i.e., those who exhibited high rates and/or severe forms of disruptive behavior) and 278 criterion students (i.e., those who did not exhibit disruptive behaviors or other behavioral adjustment problems) regarding disruptive behaviors were observed in general education classrooms. The results revealed that there were no differences in the relative occurrences of disruptive behaviors of target and criterion students across a wide range of ecological contexts. In addition, the disruptive behaviors of target students appeared to be somewhat unstoppable relative to criterion students, and the ongoing reciprocal interaction behaviors of both teachers and students remained constant over time. Teachers, however, were more likely to respond negatively to the disruptive behaviors of target students than to those of criterion students. The results and their implications are discussed.

AB - This article presents the results of a 3-year study designed to detail the ongoing reciprocal sequence of interactions between teachers and students around disruptive behaviors in general education classrooms. The ongoing reciprocal interactions of teachers and 99 target students (i.e., those who exhibited high rates and/or severe forms of disruptive behavior) and 278 criterion students (i.e., those who did not exhibit disruptive behaviors or other behavioral adjustment problems) regarding disruptive behaviors were observed in general education classrooms. The results revealed that there were no differences in the relative occurrences of disruptive behaviors of target and criterion students across a wide range of ecological contexts. In addition, the disruptive behaviors of target students appeared to be somewhat unstoppable relative to criterion students, and the ongoing reciprocal interaction behaviors of both teachers and students remained constant over time. Teachers, however, were more likely to respond negatively to the disruptive behaviors of target students than to those of criterion students. The results and their implications are discussed.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0040435119&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0040435119&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 8

SP - 27

EP - 48

JO - Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

JF - Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

SN - 1063-4266

IS - 1

ER -