On the origin of superoxide dismutase: An evolutionary perspective of superoxide-mediated redox signaling

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The field of free radical biology originated with the discovery of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in 1969. Over the last 5 decades, a plethora of research has been performed in species ranging from bacteria to mammals that has elucidated the molecular reaction, subcellular location, and specific isoforms of SOD. However, while humans have only begun to study this class of enzymes over the past 50 years, it has been estimated that these enzymes have existed for billions of years, and may be some of the original enzymes found in primitive life. As life evolved over this expanse of time, these enzymes have taken on new and different functional roles potentially in contrast to how they were originally derived. Herein, examination of the evolutionary history of these enzymes provides both an explanation and further inquiries into the modern-day role of SOD in physiology and disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number82
JournalAntioxidants
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2017

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Superoxides
Superoxide Dismutase
Oxidation-Reduction
Enzymes
Mammals
Physiology
Free Radicals
Bacteria
Protein Isoforms
History
Research

Keywords

  • Adaptation
  • Copper
  • Evolution
  • Great oxidation event
  • Hydrogen peroxide
  • Iron
  • Manganese
  • Metabolism
  • Nickel
  • Nitric oxide
  • Oxidative stress
  • Oxygen
  • Reactive oxygen species
  • Redox biology
  • Redox signaling
  • Zinc

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Physiology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

On the origin of superoxide dismutase : An evolutionary perspective of superoxide-mediated redox signaling. / Case, Adam J.

In: Antioxidants, Vol. 6, No. 4, 82, 12.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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