Object recognition in rats and mice: A one-trial non-matching-to-sample learning task to study 'recognition memory'

Rick A Bevins, Joyce Besheer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

622 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rats and mice have a tendency to interact more with a novel object than with a familiar object. This tendency has been used by behavioral pharmacologists and neuroscientists to study learning and memory. A popular protocol for such research is the object-recognition task. Animals are first placed in an apparatus and allowed to explore an object. After a prescribed interval, the animal is returned to the apparatus, which now contains the familiar object and a novel object. Object recognition is distinguished by more time spent interacting with the novel object. Although the exact processes that underlie this 'recognition memory' requires further elucidation, this method has been used to study mutant mice, aging deficits, early developmental influences, nootropic manipulations, teratological drug exposure and novelty seeking.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1306-1311
Number of pages6
JournalNature protocols
Volume1
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2006

Fingerprint

Object recognition
Rats
Animals
Learning
Nootropic Agents
Data storage equipment
Aging of materials
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Research
Recognition (Psychology)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Object recognition in rats and mice : A one-trial non-matching-to-sample learning task to study 'recognition memory'. / Bevins, Rick A; Besheer, Joyce.

In: Nature protocols, Vol. 1, No. 3, 01.08.2006, p. 1306-1311.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{9add917ac10f4b7a9d3425deb7531ba2,
title = "Object recognition in rats and mice: A one-trial non-matching-to-sample learning task to study 'recognition memory'",
abstract = "Rats and mice have a tendency to interact more with a novel object than with a familiar object. This tendency has been used by behavioral pharmacologists and neuroscientists to study learning and memory. A popular protocol for such research is the object-recognition task. Animals are first placed in an apparatus and allowed to explore an object. After a prescribed interval, the animal is returned to the apparatus, which now contains the familiar object and a novel object. Object recognition is distinguished by more time spent interacting with the novel object. Although the exact processes that underlie this 'recognition memory' requires further elucidation, this method has been used to study mutant mice, aging deficits, early developmental influences, nootropic manipulations, teratological drug exposure and novelty seeking.",
author = "Bevins, {Rick A} and Joyce Besheer",
year = "2006",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/nprot.2006.205",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "1",
pages = "1306--1311",
journal = "Nature Protocols",
issn = "1754-2189",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Object recognition in rats and mice

T2 - A one-trial non-matching-to-sample learning task to study 'recognition memory'

AU - Bevins, Rick A

AU - Besheer, Joyce

PY - 2006/8/1

Y1 - 2006/8/1

N2 - Rats and mice have a tendency to interact more with a novel object than with a familiar object. This tendency has been used by behavioral pharmacologists and neuroscientists to study learning and memory. A popular protocol for such research is the object-recognition task. Animals are first placed in an apparatus and allowed to explore an object. After a prescribed interval, the animal is returned to the apparatus, which now contains the familiar object and a novel object. Object recognition is distinguished by more time spent interacting with the novel object. Although the exact processes that underlie this 'recognition memory' requires further elucidation, this method has been used to study mutant mice, aging deficits, early developmental influences, nootropic manipulations, teratological drug exposure and novelty seeking.

AB - Rats and mice have a tendency to interact more with a novel object than with a familiar object. This tendency has been used by behavioral pharmacologists and neuroscientists to study learning and memory. A popular protocol for such research is the object-recognition task. Animals are first placed in an apparatus and allowed to explore an object. After a prescribed interval, the animal is returned to the apparatus, which now contains the familiar object and a novel object. Object recognition is distinguished by more time spent interacting with the novel object. Although the exact processes that underlie this 'recognition memory' requires further elucidation, this method has been used to study mutant mice, aging deficits, early developmental influences, nootropic manipulations, teratological drug exposure and novelty seeking.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34347215149&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34347215149&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/nprot.2006.205

DO - 10.1038/nprot.2006.205

M3 - Article

C2 - 17406415

AN - SCOPUS:34347215149

VL - 1

SP - 1306

EP - 1311

JO - Nature Protocols

JF - Nature Protocols

SN - 1754-2189

IS - 3

ER -