Nutrition and Hyperglycemia Management in the Inpatient Setting (Meals on Demand, Parenteral, or Enteral Nutrition)

Andjela T Drincic, Jon T. Knezevich, Padmaja Akkireddy

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose of Review: The goal of this paper is to provide the latest evidence and expert recommendations for management of hospitalized patients with diabetes or hyperglycemia receiving enteral (EN), parenteral (PN) nutrition support or, those with unrestricted oral diet, consuming meals on demand. Recent Findings: Patients with and without diabetes mellitus commonly develop hyperglycemia while receiving EN or PN support, placing them at increased risk of adverse outcomes, including in-hospital mortality. Very little new evidence is available in the form of randomized controlled trials (RCT) to guide the glycemic management of these patients. Reduction in the dextrose concentration within parenteral nutrition as well as selection of an enteral formula that diminishes the carbohydrate exposure to a patient receiving enteral nutrition are common strategies utilized in practice. No specific insulin regimen has been shown to be superior in the management of patients receiving EN or PN nutrition support. For those receiving oral nutrition, new challenges have been introduced with the most recent practice allowing patients to eat meals on demand, leading to extreme variability in carbohydrate exposure and risk of hypo and hyperglycemia. Summary: Synchronization of nutrition delivery with the astute use of intravenous or subcutaneous insulin therapy to match the physiologic action of insulin in patients receiving nutritional support should be implemented to improve glycemic control in hospitalized patients. Further RCTs are needed to evaluate glycemic and other clinical outcomes of patients receiving nutritional support. For patients eating meals on demand, development of hospital guidelines and policies are needed, ensuring optimization and coordination of meal insulin delivery in order to facilitate patient safety.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number59
JournalCurrent Diabetes Reports
Volume17
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2017

Fingerprint

Parenteral Nutrition
Enteral Nutrition
Hyperglycemia
Meals
Inpatients
Insulin
Nutritional Support
Small Intestine
Carbohydrates
Patient Safety
Hospital Mortality
Diabetes Mellitus
Randomized Controlled Trials
Eating
Guidelines
Diet
Glucose

Keywords

  • Diabetes
  • Enteral nutrition
  • Hospitalized patients
  • Meals on demand
  • Parenteral nutrition
  • Specialized nutrition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Nutrition and Hyperglycemia Management in the Inpatient Setting (Meals on Demand, Parenteral, or Enteral Nutrition). / Drincic, Andjela T; Knezevich, Jon T.; Akkireddy, Padmaja.

In: Current Diabetes Reports, Vol. 17, No. 8, 59, 01.08.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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