Nursing students’ perceptions of a video-based serious game's educational value: A pilot study

Hege M. Johnsen, Mariann Fossum, Pirashanthie Vivekananda-Schmidt, Ann L Fruhling, Åshild Slettebø

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Despite an increasing number of serious games (SGs) in nursing education, few evaluation studies specifically address their educational value in terms of face, content, and construct validity. Objectives To assess nursing students’ perceptions of a video-based SG in terms of face, content, and construct validity. In addition, the study assessed perceptions of usability, individual factors, and preferences regarding future use. Design A pilot study was conducted. Setting and Participants An SG prototype was implemented as part of two simulation courses in nursing education: one for home health care and one for hospital medical-surgical wards. The SG aimed to teach clinical reasoning and decision-making skills to nursing students caring for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. A total of 249 second-year nursing students participated in pilot testing of the SG. Method A paper-based survey was used to assess students’ perceptions of the SG's educational value. Results Overall, students from both simulation courses perceived the SG as educationally valuable and easy to use. No significant differences were found in perceptions of educational value between nursing students with previous healthcare experience versus those with none. However, significantly more students in the home healthcare simulation course indicated that the SG tested their clinical reasoning and decision-making skills. Students from both the medical-surgical and home healthcare simulation courses suggested that more video-based SGs should be developed and used in nursing education. Conclusions Overall, the survey results indicate that the participants perceived the SG as educationally valuable, and that the SG has potential as an educational tool in nursing education, especially in caring for patients with chronic diseases and in home healthcare simulation. Showing a SG's educational value and user acceptance among nursing students may justify the development and application of more SGs in nursing education.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)62-68
Number of pages7
JournalNurse Education Today
Volume62
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2018

Fingerprint

Nursing Students
Nursing Education
nursing
video
Delivery of Health Care
Students
Values
student
simulation
Patient-Centered Care
Home Care Services
construct validity
education
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Chronic Disease
Disease
decision making
acceptance
health care
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Clinical decision-making
  • Computer simulation
  • E-learning
  • Games
  • Health care
  • Survey
  • Validation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Education

Cite this

Nursing students’ perceptions of a video-based serious game's educational value : A pilot study. / Johnsen, Hege M.; Fossum, Mariann; Vivekananda-Schmidt, Pirashanthie; Fruhling, Ann L; Slettebø, Åshild.

In: Nurse Education Today, Vol. 62, 03.2018, p. 62-68.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Johnsen, Hege M. ; Fossum, Mariann ; Vivekananda-Schmidt, Pirashanthie ; Fruhling, Ann L ; Slettebø, Åshild. / Nursing students’ perceptions of a video-based serious game's educational value : A pilot study. In: Nurse Education Today. 2018 ; Vol. 62. pp. 62-68.
@article{7a47cbfb21b14aad8662d5750d5805e6,
title = "Nursing students’ perceptions of a video-based serious game's educational value: A pilot study",
abstract = "Background Despite an increasing number of serious games (SGs) in nursing education, few evaluation studies specifically address their educational value in terms of face, content, and construct validity. Objectives To assess nursing students’ perceptions of a video-based SG in terms of face, content, and construct validity. In addition, the study assessed perceptions of usability, individual factors, and preferences regarding future use. Design A pilot study was conducted. Setting and Participants An SG prototype was implemented as part of two simulation courses in nursing education: one for home health care and one for hospital medical-surgical wards. The SG aimed to teach clinical reasoning and decision-making skills to nursing students caring for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. A total of 249 second-year nursing students participated in pilot testing of the SG. Method A paper-based survey was used to assess students’ perceptions of the SG's educational value. Results Overall, students from both simulation courses perceived the SG as educationally valuable and easy to use. No significant differences were found in perceptions of educational value between nursing students with previous healthcare experience versus those with none. However, significantly more students in the home healthcare simulation course indicated that the SG tested their clinical reasoning and decision-making skills. Students from both the medical-surgical and home healthcare simulation courses suggested that more video-based SGs should be developed and used in nursing education. Conclusions Overall, the survey results indicate that the participants perceived the SG as educationally valuable, and that the SG has potential as an educational tool in nursing education, especially in caring for patients with chronic diseases and in home healthcare simulation. Showing a SG's educational value and user acceptance among nursing students may justify the development and application of more SGs in nursing education.",
keywords = "Clinical decision-making, Computer simulation, E-learning, Games, Health care, Survey, Validation",
author = "Johnsen, {Hege M.} and Mariann Fossum and Pirashanthie Vivekananda-Schmidt and Fruhling, {Ann L} and {\AA}shild Sletteb{\o}",
year = "2018",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1016/j.nedt.2017.12.022",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "62",
pages = "62--68",
journal = "Nurse Education Today",
issn = "0260-6917",
publisher = "Churchill Livingstone",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Nursing students’ perceptions of a video-based serious game's educational value

T2 - A pilot study

AU - Johnsen, Hege M.

AU - Fossum, Mariann

AU - Vivekananda-Schmidt, Pirashanthie

AU - Fruhling, Ann L

AU - Slettebø, Åshild

PY - 2018/3

Y1 - 2018/3

N2 - Background Despite an increasing number of serious games (SGs) in nursing education, few evaluation studies specifically address their educational value in terms of face, content, and construct validity. Objectives To assess nursing students’ perceptions of a video-based SG in terms of face, content, and construct validity. In addition, the study assessed perceptions of usability, individual factors, and preferences regarding future use. Design A pilot study was conducted. Setting and Participants An SG prototype was implemented as part of two simulation courses in nursing education: one for home health care and one for hospital medical-surgical wards. The SG aimed to teach clinical reasoning and decision-making skills to nursing students caring for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. A total of 249 second-year nursing students participated in pilot testing of the SG. Method A paper-based survey was used to assess students’ perceptions of the SG's educational value. Results Overall, students from both simulation courses perceived the SG as educationally valuable and easy to use. No significant differences were found in perceptions of educational value between nursing students with previous healthcare experience versus those with none. However, significantly more students in the home healthcare simulation course indicated that the SG tested their clinical reasoning and decision-making skills. Students from both the medical-surgical and home healthcare simulation courses suggested that more video-based SGs should be developed and used in nursing education. Conclusions Overall, the survey results indicate that the participants perceived the SG as educationally valuable, and that the SG has potential as an educational tool in nursing education, especially in caring for patients with chronic diseases and in home healthcare simulation. Showing a SG's educational value and user acceptance among nursing students may justify the development and application of more SGs in nursing education.

AB - Background Despite an increasing number of serious games (SGs) in nursing education, few evaluation studies specifically address their educational value in terms of face, content, and construct validity. Objectives To assess nursing students’ perceptions of a video-based SG in terms of face, content, and construct validity. In addition, the study assessed perceptions of usability, individual factors, and preferences regarding future use. Design A pilot study was conducted. Setting and Participants An SG prototype was implemented as part of two simulation courses in nursing education: one for home health care and one for hospital medical-surgical wards. The SG aimed to teach clinical reasoning and decision-making skills to nursing students caring for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. A total of 249 second-year nursing students participated in pilot testing of the SG. Method A paper-based survey was used to assess students’ perceptions of the SG's educational value. Results Overall, students from both simulation courses perceived the SG as educationally valuable and easy to use. No significant differences were found in perceptions of educational value between nursing students with previous healthcare experience versus those with none. However, significantly more students in the home healthcare simulation course indicated that the SG tested their clinical reasoning and decision-making skills. Students from both the medical-surgical and home healthcare simulation courses suggested that more video-based SGs should be developed and used in nursing education. Conclusions Overall, the survey results indicate that the participants perceived the SG as educationally valuable, and that the SG has potential as an educational tool in nursing education, especially in caring for patients with chronic diseases and in home healthcare simulation. Showing a SG's educational value and user acceptance among nursing students may justify the development and application of more SGs in nursing education.

KW - Clinical decision-making

KW - Computer simulation

KW - E-learning

KW - Games

KW - Health care

KW - Survey

KW - Validation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85039858184&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85039858184&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.12.022

DO - 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.12.022

M3 - Article

C2 - 29306100

AN - SCOPUS:85039858184

VL - 62

SP - 62

EP - 68

JO - Nurse Education Today

JF - Nurse Education Today

SN - 0260-6917

ER -