"Now dear, what do you remember?" Patronizing communication and older eyewitnesses' memory performance

Lindsey E. Wylie, Eve M Brank, Brian H Bornstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Previous eyewitness research has aimed to understand when age differences occur in eyewitness memory; however, few studies have explored the underlying social constructs that may explain why older adults sometimes perform more poorly as eyewitnesses. The current research examines stereotype assimilation and age-based rejection sensitivity as potential mechanisms for understanding age differences in eyewitness memory. The authors experimentally examined the effects of patronizing communication on memory performance. Findings from a structural equation model suggest that older adults' belief that they will be treated in an ageist way leads to certain instances of poorer eyewitness performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)37-66
Number of pages30
JournalAmerican Journal of Forensic Psychology
Volume33
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Communication
Structural Models
Research
Rejection (Psychology)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

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