Nosocomial urinary tract infections at a pediatric hospital

Herbert Dele Davies, E. L.Ford Jones, R. Y. Sheng, B. Leslie, A. G. Matlow, R. Gold

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although the epidemiology of nosocomial urinary tract infections (NUTIs) is well-described in the adult population, there is little information on children. We therefore reviewed all our patients with NUTIs, to determine their age, underlying diagnoses, microorganisms involved, use of catheters and secondary bacteremias. During a 2-year period at our institution, NUTIs accounted for 10% of all nosocomial infections (0.8 infections/100 admissions). Of 44948 patients admitted during this period 0.7% (n = 318) acquired 351 episodes of NUTI. The patient ages ranged from 5 days to 21 years. The highest rates of NUTIs per ward (NUTI/100 admissions or transfers to the ward) were seen in the neonatal surgery (4.8), hematology/oncology (2.7), infant neurosurgery (2.1) and neonatal intensive care units (1.9). The most common organisms isolated were Escherichia coli (26%), Enterococccus sp. (15%), Pseudomonas sp. (13%), Klebsiella sp. (10%) and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (9%). Catheterrelated infections accounted for 48% of all the NUTIs. Secondary bacteremia occurred rarely, with an incidence of 2.9% (n = 7). We conclude that NUTIs represent an important proportion (10%) of nosocomial infections in our population of hospitalized children, but secondary bacteremia is uncommon.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)349-354
Number of pages6
JournalPediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Volume11
Issue number5
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

Fingerprint

Pediatric Hospitals
Cross Infection
Urinary Tract Infections
Bacteremia
Hospitalized Child
Klebsiella
Coagulase
Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Neurosurgery
Hematology
Pseudomonas
Infection
Staphylococcus
Population
Epidemiology
Catheters
Escherichia coli

Keywords

  • Baeteremia
  • Cross infection
  • Pediatric
  • Urinary tract catheterization
  • Urinary tract infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Davies, H. D., Jones, E. L. F., Sheng, R. Y., Leslie, B., Matlow, A. G., & Gold, R. (1992). Nosocomial urinary tract infections at a pediatric hospital. Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, 11(5), 349-354.

Nosocomial urinary tract infections at a pediatric hospital. / Davies, Herbert Dele; Jones, E. L.Ford; Sheng, R. Y.; Leslie, B.; Matlow, A. G.; Gold, R.

In: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, Vol. 11, No. 5, 01.01.1992, p. 349-354.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Davies, HD, Jones, ELF, Sheng, RY, Leslie, B, Matlow, AG & Gold, R 1992, 'Nosocomial urinary tract infections at a pediatric hospital', Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, vol. 11, no. 5, pp. 349-354.
Davies HD, Jones ELF, Sheng RY, Leslie B, Matlow AG, Gold R. Nosocomial urinary tract infections at a pediatric hospital. Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal. 1992 Jan 1;11(5):349-354.
Davies, Herbert Dele ; Jones, E. L.Ford ; Sheng, R. Y. ; Leslie, B. ; Matlow, A. G. ; Gold, R. / Nosocomial urinary tract infections at a pediatric hospital. In: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal. 1992 ; Vol. 11, No. 5. pp. 349-354.
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