Non-destructive detection of water stress and estimation of relative water content in maize

Arthur I. Zygielbaum, Anatoly A. Gitelson, Timothy J. Arkebauer, Donald C. Rundquist

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Non-destructive estimation of leaf water content provides vital information about vegetation productivity. We report here on controlled seven day experiments using greenhouse-grown maize. Fifty plants were randomly assigned to two equal groups: water stressed and well watered. Spectroscopic, relative water content (RWC), and chlorophyll concentration measurements were made daily. Because water molecules absorb radiation in near- and middle-infrared, most efforts to sense water deficit remotely utilize infrared wavelengths. In these experiments, we identified a strong, systematic, and repeatable relationship between photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, 400700 nm) albedo and leaf RWC. We show that visible spectrum reflectance provides a means to detect early stages of plant stress and estimate leaf RWC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberL12403
JournalGeophysical Research Letters
Volume36
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2009

Fingerprint

water stress
moisture content
maize
water content
leaves
photosynthetically active radiation
water
plant stress
visible spectrum
greenhouses
chlorophylls
vegetation
albedo
productivity
reflectance
chlorophyll
experiment
wavelength
well
detection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geophysics
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Cite this

Non-destructive detection of water stress and estimation of relative water content in maize. / Zygielbaum, Arthur I.; Gitelson, Anatoly A.; Arkebauer, Timothy J.; Rundquist, Donald C.

In: Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 36, No. 12, L12403, 01.06.2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zygielbaum, Arthur I. ; Gitelson, Anatoly A. ; Arkebauer, Timothy J. ; Rundquist, Donald C. / Non-destructive detection of water stress and estimation of relative water content in maize. In: Geophysical Research Letters. 2009 ; Vol. 36, No. 12.
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