Non-24-hour sleep-wake syndrome following a car accident

Diane B. Boivin, F. O. James, Jonathan Santo, O. Caliyurt, C. Chalk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors report the case of a 39-year-old sighted woman who displayed non-24-hour sleep-wake cycles following a car accident. The phase relationship between endogenous circadian markers such as plasma melatonin and 6-sulfatoxymelatonin rhythms and self-selected sleep times was abnormal. A laboratory investigation indicated that she was sensitive to bright light as a circadian synchronizer. MRI and brain CT scans were normal, but microscopic brain damage in the vicinity of the suprachiasmatic nucleus or its output pathways is plausible.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1841-1843
Number of pages3
JournalNeurology
Volume60
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 10 2003

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Accidents
Sleep
Suprachiasmatic Nucleus
Brain
Melatonin
Light
6-sulfatoxymelatonin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Boivin, D. B., James, F. O., Santo, J., Caliyurt, O., & Chalk, C. (2003). Non-24-hour sleep-wake syndrome following a car accident. Neurology, 60(11), 1841-1843. https://doi.org/10.1212/01.WNL.0000061482.24750.7C

Non-24-hour sleep-wake syndrome following a car accident. / Boivin, Diane B.; James, F. O.; Santo, Jonathan; Caliyurt, O.; Chalk, C.

In: Neurology, Vol. 60, No. 11, 10.06.2003, p. 1841-1843.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Boivin, DB, James, FO, Santo, J, Caliyurt, O & Chalk, C 2003, 'Non-24-hour sleep-wake syndrome following a car accident', Neurology, vol. 60, no. 11, pp. 1841-1843. https://doi.org/10.1212/01.WNL.0000061482.24750.7C
Boivin, Diane B. ; James, F. O. ; Santo, Jonathan ; Caliyurt, O. ; Chalk, C. / Non-24-hour sleep-wake syndrome following a car accident. In: Neurology. 2003 ; Vol. 60, No. 11. pp. 1841-1843.
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