No longer intending: The relationship between relinquished fertility intentions and distress

Lynn White, Julia McQuillan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We use data from both waves of the National Survey of Families and Households to assess whether relinquishing a serious intention to have (more) children leads to greater increases in depressive symptoms than continuing confidence in childbearing intentions. Our sample includes 2,200 individuals of childbearing age, men and women, all parities, and all marital statuses. Change score analysis shows that individuals who relinquished a serious intent to have children had elevated distress at Time 2 and that the association is conditioned by gender, health, and education. We find that fertility potential can be important to psychosocial well-being and that closing the door on future fertility, especially for women, those in ill health, and the better educated, leads to increased distress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)478-490
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Marriage and Family
Volume68
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2006

Fingerprint

fertility
health
marital status
confidence
well-being
gender
education
Intentions
Fertility
Health
time
Waves
Household
Confidence
Education
Depressive Symptoms
Well-being
Parity
Marital Status

Keywords

  • Change analysis
  • Distress
  • Fertility intentions
  • Gender
  • Infertility
  • Parenthood

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anthropology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

No longer intending : The relationship between relinquished fertility intentions and distress. / White, Lynn; McQuillan, Julia.

In: Journal of Marriage and Family, Vol. 68, No. 2, 01.05.2006, p. 478-490.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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