No evidence for sex differences in the severity and treatment of cancer pain

Janet M. Edrington, Steven Paul, Marylin Dodd, Claudia West, Noreen Facione, Debu Tripathy, Peter Koo, Karen Schumacher, Christine Miaskowski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While chronic pain is experienced by approximately 50-90% of patients with metastatic cancer, little is known about sex differences in chronic cancer pain. Therefore, the purposes of this study, in a sample of oncology outpatients (n=187) who were experiencing pain from bone metastasis, were: 1) to determine if there were sex differences in various pain characteristics, including pain intensity, and 2) to determine if there were sex differences in the prescription and consumption of analgesic medications. No significant sex differences were found in any of the baseline pain characteristics. In addition, no significant sex differences were found in analgesic prescriptions or intake of analgesic medications. Of note, men reported significantly higher pain interference scores for sexual activity than women. The study findings are important because they suggest that, unlike in acute pain, sex may not influence patients' perceptions of and responses to chronic cancer pain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)225-232
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Pain and Symptom Management
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2004

Fingerprint

Sex Characteristics
Pain
Chronic Pain
Analgesics
Prescriptions
Therapeutics
Acute Pain
Sexual Behavior
Outpatients
Cancer Pain
Neoplasm Metastasis
Bone and Bones
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Gender differences
  • cancer pain
  • cancer pain management
  • chronic pain
  • sex differences

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Edrington, J. M., Paul, S., Dodd, M., West, C., Facione, N., Tripathy, D., ... Miaskowski, C. (2004). No evidence for sex differences in the severity and treatment of cancer pain. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 28(3), 225-232. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2003.12.013

No evidence for sex differences in the severity and treatment of cancer pain. / Edrington, Janet M.; Paul, Steven; Dodd, Marylin; West, Claudia; Facione, Noreen; Tripathy, Debu; Koo, Peter; Schumacher, Karen; Miaskowski, Christine.

In: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, Vol. 28, No. 3, 01.09.2004, p. 225-232.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Edrington, JM, Paul, S, Dodd, M, West, C, Facione, N, Tripathy, D, Koo, P, Schumacher, K & Miaskowski, C 2004, 'No evidence for sex differences in the severity and treatment of cancer pain', Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, vol. 28, no. 3, pp. 225-232. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2003.12.013
Edrington, Janet M. ; Paul, Steven ; Dodd, Marylin ; West, Claudia ; Facione, Noreen ; Tripathy, Debu ; Koo, Peter ; Schumacher, Karen ; Miaskowski, Christine. / No evidence for sex differences in the severity and treatment of cancer pain. In: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management. 2004 ; Vol. 28, No. 3. pp. 225-232.
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