Night moves: A qualitative investigation of street-level sex work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The subculture of street-level sex work including the social environment, drug use and abuse, and violence was examined. Personal interviews were conducted with 43 women involved in streetwalking prostitution. Data were analyzed using Phenomenological Descriptive Analysis (Colaizzi, 1978). Several participants reported developing emotional relationships and having children with clients, former clients, or pimps; some participants were married to men who pimped them. Supportive relationships with other streetwalkers were largely nonexistent; streetwalking constitutes a solitary business for most. The majority reported drug addiction, although less than half entered prostitution to support an already established drug habit. Financial need propelled many into the streets. Victimization and subjection to multiple forms of abuse were commonly reported but did not constitute justification for leaving the streets. Implications of this investigation are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)63-73
Number of pages11
JournalPsychology of Women Quarterly
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2002

Fingerprint

Sex Work
prostitution
Substance-Related Disorders
drug dependence
subculture
drug abuse
victimization
habits
drug use
Crime Victims
abuse
Social Environment
violence
drug
Violence
Habits
interview
Interviews
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Night

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Night moves : A qualitative investigation of street-level sex work. / Dalla, Rochelle L.

In: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Vol. 26, No. 1, 03.2002, p. 63-73.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e870f7a880394720ae3550d804b1835b,
title = "Night moves: A qualitative investigation of street-level sex work",
abstract = "The subculture of street-level sex work including the social environment, drug use and abuse, and violence was examined. Personal interviews were conducted with 43 women involved in streetwalking prostitution. Data were analyzed using Phenomenological Descriptive Analysis (Colaizzi, 1978). Several participants reported developing emotional relationships and having children with clients, former clients, or pimps; some participants were married to men who pimped them. Supportive relationships with other streetwalkers were largely nonexistent; streetwalking constitutes a solitary business for most. The majority reported drug addiction, although less than half entered prostitution to support an already established drug habit. Financial need propelled many into the streets. Victimization and subjection to multiple forms of abuse were commonly reported but did not constitute justification for leaving the streets. Implications of this investigation are discussed.",
author = "Dalla, {Rochelle L.}",
year = "2002",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1111/1471-6402.00044",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "26",
pages = "63--73",
journal = "Psychology of Women Quarterly",
issn = "0361-6843",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Night moves

T2 - A qualitative investigation of street-level sex work

AU - Dalla, Rochelle L.

PY - 2002/3

Y1 - 2002/3

N2 - The subculture of street-level sex work including the social environment, drug use and abuse, and violence was examined. Personal interviews were conducted with 43 women involved in streetwalking prostitution. Data were analyzed using Phenomenological Descriptive Analysis (Colaizzi, 1978). Several participants reported developing emotional relationships and having children with clients, former clients, or pimps; some participants were married to men who pimped them. Supportive relationships with other streetwalkers were largely nonexistent; streetwalking constitutes a solitary business for most. The majority reported drug addiction, although less than half entered prostitution to support an already established drug habit. Financial need propelled many into the streets. Victimization and subjection to multiple forms of abuse were commonly reported but did not constitute justification for leaving the streets. Implications of this investigation are discussed.

AB - The subculture of street-level sex work including the social environment, drug use and abuse, and violence was examined. Personal interviews were conducted with 43 women involved in streetwalking prostitution. Data were analyzed using Phenomenological Descriptive Analysis (Colaizzi, 1978). Several participants reported developing emotional relationships and having children with clients, former clients, or pimps; some participants were married to men who pimped them. Supportive relationships with other streetwalkers were largely nonexistent; streetwalking constitutes a solitary business for most. The majority reported drug addiction, although less than half entered prostitution to support an already established drug habit. Financial need propelled many into the streets. Victimization and subjection to multiple forms of abuse were commonly reported but did not constitute justification for leaving the streets. Implications of this investigation are discussed.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036004931&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036004931&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/1471-6402.00044

DO - 10.1111/1471-6402.00044

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0036004931

VL - 26

SP - 63

EP - 73

JO - Psychology of Women Quarterly

JF - Psychology of Women Quarterly

SN - 0361-6843

IS - 1

ER -