NF-kappaB p65-dependent transactivation of miRNA genes following Cryptosporidium parvum infection stimulates epithelial cell immune responses

Rui Zhou, Guoku Hu, Jun Liu, Ai Yu Gong, Kristen M. Drescher, Xian Ming Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

140 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cryptosporidium parvum is a protozoan parasite that infects the gastrointestinal epithelium and causes diarrheal disease worldwide. Innate epithelial immune responses are key mediators of the host's defense to C. parvum. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level and are involved in regulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses. Using an in vitro model of human cryptosporidiosis, we analyzed C. parvum-induced miRNA expression in biliary epithelial cells (i.e., cholangiocytes). Our results demonstrated differential alterations in the mature miRNA expression profile in cholangiocytes following C. parvum infection or lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Database analysis of C. parvum-upregulated miRNAs revealed potential NF-κB binding sites in the promoter elements of a subset of miRNA genes. We demonstrated that mir-125b-1, mir-21, mir-30b, and mir-23b-27b-24-1 cluster genes were transactivated through promoter binding of the NF-κB p65 subunit following C. parvum infection. In contrast, C. parvum transactivated mir-30c and mir-16 genes in cholangiocytes in a p65-independent manner. Importantly, functional inhibition of selected p65-dependent miRNAs in cholangiocytes increased C. parvum burden. Thus, we have identified a panel of miRNAs regulated through promoter binding of the NF-κB p65 subunit in human cholangiocytes in response to C. parvum infection, a process that may be relevant to the regulation of epithelial anti-microbial defense in general. Copyright:

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere1000681
JournalPLoS pathogens
Volume5
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2009

Fingerprint

Cryptosporidium parvum
NF-kappa B
MicroRNAs
Transcriptional Activation
Epithelial Cells
Infection
Genes
Innate Immunity
Cryptosporidiosis
Adaptive Immunity
Multigene Family
Lipopolysaccharides
Parasites
Epithelium
Binding Sites
Databases
Gene Expression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Virology

Cite this

NF-kappaB p65-dependent transactivation of miRNA genes following Cryptosporidium parvum infection stimulates epithelial cell immune responses. / Zhou, Rui; Hu, Guoku; Liu, Jun; Gong, Ai Yu; Drescher, Kristen M.; Chen, Xian Ming.

In: PLoS pathogens, Vol. 5, No. 12, e1000681, 01.12.2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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