Newly Diagnosed Lung Cancer

Which Molecular Tests Are Needed for Optimal Treatment Decision Making?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The management of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has changed dramatically over the past few years due to our expanded knowledge of the molecular basis of lung cancer (driver mutations and immune targets) and drugs that affect these pathways, namely targeted agents and checkpoint inhibitors. Consequently, it is important to test patients with newly diagnosed advanced NSCLC for potentially significant molecular abnormalities prior to the initiation of treatment. This requires close coordination between the surgical pathologist, the molecular pathologist, and the medical oncologist to ensure that the biopsy specimen is used judiciously to get all necessary information. In this article, I suggest an approach to the diagnostic evaluation of patients with newly diagnosed advanced NSCLC, in an attempt to identify the best treatment options for each.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)276-280
Number of pages5
JournalOncology (Williston Park, N.Y.)
Volume32
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 1 2018

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Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
Lung Neoplasms
Decision Making
Therapeutics
Biopsy
Mutation
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Pathologists
Oncologists

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Newly Diagnosed Lung Cancer : Which Molecular Tests Are Needed for Optimal Treatment Decision Making? / Ganti, Apar Kishor P.

In: Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.), Vol. 32, No. 6, 01.06.2018, p. 276-280.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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