New insights into gout epidemiology

Ted R Mikuls, Kenneth G. Saag

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose of review: The systematic study of gout dates to antiquity, to Hippocrates' initial descriptions of disease risk factors including advancing age, female menopause, and male sex. Although urate crystal diagnosis remains the gold standard for diagnosis it is impractical at a population level. Beyond crystal diagnosis, progress in gout epidemiology has been hampered by the lack of a standardized approach in defining case status. Recent findings: Substantial progress has been made in furthering our understanding of gout over the last few decades. Taken together, epidemiologic investigations suggest that gout frequency is on the rise worldwide. Our understanding of gout risk factors continues to expand with the recent availability of well designed prospective cohort studies from both the USA and abroad. Moreover, recent investigations have shed important insight on the complex relationships of hyperuricemia, gout, and comorbid conditions, particularly the association of serum urate levels with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Summary: Despite our growing understanding of the many facets of this age-old condition, current evidence continues to underscore the frequency with which gout is characterized by suboptimal care. Below we review our current knowledge of gout epidemiology with an emphasis on the association of hyperuricemia with cardiovascular comorbidity and evidence and determinants of continued suboptimal care in gout.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)199-203
Number of pages5
JournalCurrent Opinion in Rheumatology
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2006

Fingerprint

Gout
Epidemiology
Hyperuricemia
Uric Acid
Menopause
Comorbidity
Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies
Morbidity
Mortality

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Comorbidity
  • Epidemiology
  • Gout
  • Hyperuricemia
  • NHANES
  • Serum urate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology

Cite this

New insights into gout epidemiology. / Mikuls, Ted R; Saag, Kenneth G.

In: Current Opinion in Rheumatology, Vol. 18, No. 2, 01.03.2006, p. 199-203.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Mikuls, Ted R ; Saag, Kenneth G. / New insights into gout epidemiology. In: Current Opinion in Rheumatology. 2006 ; Vol. 18, No. 2. pp. 199-203.
@article{4b54f6404c9f40d28e00e1fa7ecf3561,
title = "New insights into gout epidemiology",
abstract = "Purpose of review: The systematic study of gout dates to antiquity, to Hippocrates' initial descriptions of disease risk factors including advancing age, female menopause, and male sex. Although urate crystal diagnosis remains the gold standard for diagnosis it is impractical at a population level. Beyond crystal diagnosis, progress in gout epidemiology has been hampered by the lack of a standardized approach in defining case status. Recent findings: Substantial progress has been made in furthering our understanding of gout over the last few decades. Taken together, epidemiologic investigations suggest that gout frequency is on the rise worldwide. Our understanding of gout risk factors continues to expand with the recent availability of well designed prospective cohort studies from both the USA and abroad. Moreover, recent investigations have shed important insight on the complex relationships of hyperuricemia, gout, and comorbid conditions, particularly the association of serum urate levels with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Summary: Despite our growing understanding of the many facets of this age-old condition, current evidence continues to underscore the frequency with which gout is characterized by suboptimal care. Below we review our current knowledge of gout epidemiology with an emphasis on the association of hyperuricemia with cardiovascular comorbidity and evidence and determinants of continued suboptimal care in gout.",
keywords = "Cardiovascular disease, Comorbidity, Epidemiology, Gout, Hyperuricemia, NHANES, Serum urate",
author = "Mikuls, {Ted R} and Saag, {Kenneth G.}",
year = "2006",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/01.bor.0000209435.89720.7c",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "18",
pages = "199--203",
journal = "Current Opinion in Rheumatology",
issn = "1040-8711",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - New insights into gout epidemiology

AU - Mikuls, Ted R

AU - Saag, Kenneth G.

PY - 2006/3/1

Y1 - 2006/3/1

N2 - Purpose of review: The systematic study of gout dates to antiquity, to Hippocrates' initial descriptions of disease risk factors including advancing age, female menopause, and male sex. Although urate crystal diagnosis remains the gold standard for diagnosis it is impractical at a population level. Beyond crystal diagnosis, progress in gout epidemiology has been hampered by the lack of a standardized approach in defining case status. Recent findings: Substantial progress has been made in furthering our understanding of gout over the last few decades. Taken together, epidemiologic investigations suggest that gout frequency is on the rise worldwide. Our understanding of gout risk factors continues to expand with the recent availability of well designed prospective cohort studies from both the USA and abroad. Moreover, recent investigations have shed important insight on the complex relationships of hyperuricemia, gout, and comorbid conditions, particularly the association of serum urate levels with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Summary: Despite our growing understanding of the many facets of this age-old condition, current evidence continues to underscore the frequency with which gout is characterized by suboptimal care. Below we review our current knowledge of gout epidemiology with an emphasis on the association of hyperuricemia with cardiovascular comorbidity and evidence and determinants of continued suboptimal care in gout.

AB - Purpose of review: The systematic study of gout dates to antiquity, to Hippocrates' initial descriptions of disease risk factors including advancing age, female menopause, and male sex. Although urate crystal diagnosis remains the gold standard for diagnosis it is impractical at a population level. Beyond crystal diagnosis, progress in gout epidemiology has been hampered by the lack of a standardized approach in defining case status. Recent findings: Substantial progress has been made in furthering our understanding of gout over the last few decades. Taken together, epidemiologic investigations suggest that gout frequency is on the rise worldwide. Our understanding of gout risk factors continues to expand with the recent availability of well designed prospective cohort studies from both the USA and abroad. Moreover, recent investigations have shed important insight on the complex relationships of hyperuricemia, gout, and comorbid conditions, particularly the association of serum urate levels with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Summary: Despite our growing understanding of the many facets of this age-old condition, current evidence continues to underscore the frequency with which gout is characterized by suboptimal care. Below we review our current knowledge of gout epidemiology with an emphasis on the association of hyperuricemia with cardiovascular comorbidity and evidence and determinants of continued suboptimal care in gout.

KW - Cardiovascular disease

KW - Comorbidity

KW - Epidemiology

KW - Gout

KW - Hyperuricemia

KW - NHANES

KW - Serum urate

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33646703978&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33646703978&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/01.bor.0000209435.89720.7c

DO - 10.1097/01.bor.0000209435.89720.7c

M3 - Review article

C2 - 16462529

AN - SCOPUS:33646703978

VL - 18

SP - 199

EP - 203

JO - Current Opinion in Rheumatology

JF - Current Opinion in Rheumatology

SN - 1040-8711

IS - 2

ER -