New developments in laser acceleration of beams

D. Umstadter, S. Banerjee, K. Flippo, A. Maksimchuk, K. Nemoto, N. Saleh, X. Wang, P. Zhang, V. Bychenkov

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

We report experimental results in which ultra-short duration (femtosecond) laser pulses from tabletop lasers are focused to intensities above 1019 W/cm2 onto either gas jets or thin solid-density films. At such extreme electromagnetic field strengths (1011 V/cm), plasmas are formed in which the electrons oscillate relativistically, creating gigabar pressure. The displacement of electrons-but not the heavier ions-from the region of the laser focus drives large space-charge fields (exceeding 1 GeV/cm). For laser pulses that are short compared with a plasma period, this takes the form of a wakefield, which accelerates MeV energy beams of electrons. For pulses long compared with a plasma period, we show that a Coulomb explosion accelerates protons (or other ions) to energy in excess of 10 MeV in well-collimated beams. In both cases, not only is this acceleration gradient up to a thousand times greater than in radio-frequency accelerators, but we also found that their transverse geometrical emittances are at least comparable, e.g., up to 1010 particles per pulse and divergence angles as low as 1 for electrons and 20 for protons. Additionally, the repetition rate of the electron gun is 10 Hz, a thousand-fold improvement over its past performance. In order to reduce the large electron energy spread, we show experimentally the injection of electrons into a laser-driven plasma wave by use of a separate synchronized laser pulse. Applications of these subpicosecond duration pulses include laboratory astrophysics, cancer radiotherapy, fast-ignitor fusion, radiochemistry, radiobiology, isotope production, and high-current injectors for high-energy and nuclear physics. For instance, with just a single pulse of MeV deuterons, we created a radioisotope in the reaction 10B(d,n)11C. Similarly, we showed that a single pulse of electrons was sufficient for pulsed radiolysis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages117-121
Number of pages5
StatePublished - Dec 1 2001
Event2001 Particle Accelerator Conference - Chicago, IL, United States
Duration: Jun 18 2001Jun 22 2001

Conference

Conference2001 Particle Accelerator Conference
CountryUnited States
CityChicago, IL
Period6/18/016/22/01

Fingerprint

Electrons
Lasers
Laser pulses
Plasmas
Protons
Plasma waves
Nuclear physics
Astrophysics
Radiolysis
Electron guns
High energy physics
Radiotherapy
Ultrashort pulses
Heavy ions
Electric space charge
Radioisotopes
Electromagnetic fields
Explosions
Isotopes
Particle accelerators

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Umstadter, D., Banerjee, S., Flippo, K., Maksimchuk, A., Nemoto, K., Saleh, N., ... Bychenkov, V. (2001). New developments in laser acceleration of beams. 117-121. Paper presented at 2001 Particle Accelerator Conference, Chicago, IL, United States.

New developments in laser acceleration of beams. / Umstadter, D.; Banerjee, S.; Flippo, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Nemoto, K.; Saleh, N.; Wang, X.; Zhang, P.; Bychenkov, V.

2001. 117-121 Paper presented at 2001 Particle Accelerator Conference, Chicago, IL, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Umstadter, D, Banerjee, S, Flippo, K, Maksimchuk, A, Nemoto, K, Saleh, N, Wang, X, Zhang, P & Bychenkov, V 2001, 'New developments in laser acceleration of beams', Paper presented at 2001 Particle Accelerator Conference, Chicago, IL, United States, 6/18/01 - 6/22/01 pp. 117-121.
Umstadter D, Banerjee S, Flippo K, Maksimchuk A, Nemoto K, Saleh N et al. New developments in laser acceleration of beams. 2001. Paper presented at 2001 Particle Accelerator Conference, Chicago, IL, United States.
Umstadter, D. ; Banerjee, S. ; Flippo, K. ; Maksimchuk, A. ; Nemoto, K. ; Saleh, N. ; Wang, X. ; Zhang, P. ; Bychenkov, V. / New developments in laser acceleration of beams. Paper presented at 2001 Particle Accelerator Conference, Chicago, IL, United States.5 p.
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