Abstract

Background: Biomarkers of chemotherapy-related cognitive impairment (CRCI) in hematologic cancer are understudied and underdeveloped. We evaluated the feasibility of using ophthalmic and neurophysiologic markers to assess CRCI in hematologic cancer. Methods: Hematologic cancer patients either receiving (Ctx+) or not receiving (Ctx−) chemotherapy were recruited from a tertiary medical center. Demographically-matched healthy controls (HC) were also recruited. Ctx+ participants completed the following study visits: (1) after diagnosis but prior to chemotherapy (baseline); (2) after one treatment cycle (one-month post-baseline); and (3) after three treatment cycles (three-months post-baseline). Comparison subjects completed assessments at similar intervals. Participants completed: (1) neuropsychological assessments of attention and executive function; (2) neurophysiologic assessments of control over spatial attention and working memory; and (3) ophthalmic assessments of contrast sensitivity and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Results: We enrolled 45 participants (15 per group), and 30 participants (Ctx+ = 8; Ctx− = 10; HC = 12) completed all study visits. Ctx+ participants performed worse than HC participants on neuropsychological measures of attention and executive function. Both Ctx+ and Ctx− participants showed changes in neurophysiologic measures of control over spatial attention that differed from HC participants. Ctx+ participants showed chemotherapy-related declines in contrast sensitivity that were predicted by OCT retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFL) changes. Changes in neurophysiologic measures of control over spatial attention were also predicted by OCT RNFL changes. Conclusion: We demonstrated the feasibility of using ophthalmic and neurophysiologic markers as rapid and non-invasive measures that may be useful for tracking CRCI in hematologic cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number116644
JournalJournal of the neurological sciences
Volume410
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2020

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Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Chemotherapy
  • Cognition
  • Contrast sensitivity
  • EEG
  • OCT

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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