Neuromagnetic correlates of developmental changes in endogenous high-frequency brain oscillations in children: A wavelet-based beamformer study

Jing Xiang, Yang Liu, Yingying Wang, Rupesh Kotecha, Elijah G. Kirtman, Yangmei Chen, Xiaolin Huo, Hisako Fujiwara, Nat Hemasilpin, Ton deGrauw, Douglas Rose

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent studies have found that the brain generates very fast oscillations. The objective of the present study was to investigate the spectral, spatial and coherent features of high-frequency brain oscillations in the developing brain. Sixty healthy children and 20 healthy adults were studied using a 275-channel magnetoencephalography (MEG) system. MEG data were digitized at 12,000 Hz. The frequency characteristics of neuromagnetic signals in 0.5-2000 Hz were quantitatively determined with Morlet wavelet transform. The magnetic sources were volumetrically estimated with wavelet-based beamformer at 2.5 mm resolution. The neural networks of endogenous brain oscillations were analyzed with coherent imaging. Neuromagnetic activities in 8-12 Hz and 800-900 Hz were found to be the most reliable frequency bands in healthy children. The neuromagnetic signals were localized in the occipital, temporal and frontal cortices. The activities in the occipital and temporal cortices were strongly correlated in 8-12 Hz but not in 800-900 Hz. In comparison to adults, children had brain oscillations in intermingled frequency bands. Developmental changes in children were identified for both low- and high-frequency brain activities. The results of the present study suggest that the development of the brain is associated with spatial and coherent changes of endogenous brain activities in both low- and high-frequency ranges. Analysis of high-frequency neuromagnetic oscillation may provide novel insights into cerebral mechanisms of brain function. The noninvasive measurement of neuromagnetic brain oscillations in the developing brain may open a new window for analysis of brain function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)28-39
Number of pages12
JournalBrain Research
Volume1274
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 5 2009

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Brain
Magnetoencephalography
Occipital Lobe
Temporal Lobe
Wavelet Analysis
Frontal Lobe

Keywords

  • Brain
  • Child
  • Development
  • High-frequency oscillation
  • Magnetic source imaging
  • Magnetoencephalography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology

Cite this

Neuromagnetic correlates of developmental changes in endogenous high-frequency brain oscillations in children : A wavelet-based beamformer study. / Xiang, Jing; Liu, Yang; Wang, Yingying; Kotecha, Rupesh; Kirtman, Elijah G.; Chen, Yangmei; Huo, Xiaolin; Fujiwara, Hisako; Hemasilpin, Nat; deGrauw, Ton; Rose, Douglas.

In: Brain Research, Vol. 1274, 05.06.2009, p. 28-39.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Xiang, J, Liu, Y, Wang, Y, Kotecha, R, Kirtman, EG, Chen, Y, Huo, X, Fujiwara, H, Hemasilpin, N, deGrauw, T & Rose, D 2009, 'Neuromagnetic correlates of developmental changes in endogenous high-frequency brain oscillations in children: A wavelet-based beamformer study', Brain Research, vol. 1274, pp. 28-39. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2009.03.068
Xiang, Jing ; Liu, Yang ; Wang, Yingying ; Kotecha, Rupesh ; Kirtman, Elijah G. ; Chen, Yangmei ; Huo, Xiaolin ; Fujiwara, Hisako ; Hemasilpin, Nat ; deGrauw, Ton ; Rose, Douglas. / Neuromagnetic correlates of developmental changes in endogenous high-frequency brain oscillations in children : A wavelet-based beamformer study. In: Brain Research. 2009 ; Vol. 1274. pp. 28-39.
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