Neurocognitive explanations of the antisocial personality disorders

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper aims to provide an understanding of the antisocial personality disorders (APDs; i.e. conduct disorder, antisocial personality disorder and psychopathy) that is informed by developmental cognitive neuroscience. These disorders must be understood in terms of both the information-processing impairments shown by afflicted individuals and the dysfunctional neural substrates that give rise to these impairments. Three broad conceptualizations of the causes of APDs are discussed. These are: (1) an impairment in executive functioning implicating prefrontal cortex; (2) an impairment in executive emotion's processing implicating orbito-frontal cortex; (3) an impairment in emotion processing implicating the amygdala. The literature is discussed and it is concluded that: first, executive functioning impairments are not associated with the development of the APDs, although the individual's executive functioning may interact with other impairments to effect prognosis; second, impairments of executive emotion processing may be implicated in the development of the APDs, though the evidence is equivocal and the lack of any detailed theory makes firm conclusions difficult; third, the development of the APDs is associated with an impairment in emotional processing and that this impairment may be due to dysfunction within a circuit which involves the amygdala.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCriminal Behaviour and Mental Health
Volume10
Issue numberSPEC.ISS.
StatePublished - Dec 1 2000

Fingerprint

pamidronate
Antisocial Personality Disorder
Emotions
Amygdala
Conduct Disorder
Frontal Lobe
Prefrontal Cortex
Automatic Data Processing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Psychology (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Neurocognitive explanations of the antisocial personality disorders. / Blair, Robert James; Frith, U.

In: Criminal Behaviour and Mental Health, Vol. 10, No. SPEC.ISS., 01.12.2000.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{6ed42f09194948b3a04feb5e79191697,
title = "Neurocognitive explanations of the antisocial personality disorders",
abstract = "This paper aims to provide an understanding of the antisocial personality disorders (APDs; i.e. conduct disorder, antisocial personality disorder and psychopathy) that is informed by developmental cognitive neuroscience. These disorders must be understood in terms of both the information-processing impairments shown by afflicted individuals and the dysfunctional neural substrates that give rise to these impairments. Three broad conceptualizations of the causes of APDs are discussed. These are: (1) an impairment in executive functioning implicating prefrontal cortex; (2) an impairment in executive emotion's processing implicating orbito-frontal cortex; (3) an impairment in emotion processing implicating the amygdala. The literature is discussed and it is concluded that: first, executive functioning impairments are not associated with the development of the APDs, although the individual's executive functioning may interact with other impairments to effect prognosis; second, impairments of executive emotion processing may be implicated in the development of the APDs, though the evidence is equivocal and the lack of any detailed theory makes firm conclusions difficult; third, the development of the APDs is associated with an impairment in emotional processing and that this impairment may be due to dysfunction within a circuit which involves the amygdala.",
author = "Blair, {Robert James} and U. Frith",
year = "2000",
month = "12",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "10",
journal = "Criminal Behaviour and Mental Health",
issn = "0957-9664",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Ltd",
number = "SPEC.ISS.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Neurocognitive explanations of the antisocial personality disorders

AU - Blair, Robert James

AU - Frith, U.

PY - 2000/12/1

Y1 - 2000/12/1

N2 - This paper aims to provide an understanding of the antisocial personality disorders (APDs; i.e. conduct disorder, antisocial personality disorder and psychopathy) that is informed by developmental cognitive neuroscience. These disorders must be understood in terms of both the information-processing impairments shown by afflicted individuals and the dysfunctional neural substrates that give rise to these impairments. Three broad conceptualizations of the causes of APDs are discussed. These are: (1) an impairment in executive functioning implicating prefrontal cortex; (2) an impairment in executive emotion's processing implicating orbito-frontal cortex; (3) an impairment in emotion processing implicating the amygdala. The literature is discussed and it is concluded that: first, executive functioning impairments are not associated with the development of the APDs, although the individual's executive functioning may interact with other impairments to effect prognosis; second, impairments of executive emotion processing may be implicated in the development of the APDs, though the evidence is equivocal and the lack of any detailed theory makes firm conclusions difficult; third, the development of the APDs is associated with an impairment in emotional processing and that this impairment may be due to dysfunction within a circuit which involves the amygdala.

AB - This paper aims to provide an understanding of the antisocial personality disorders (APDs; i.e. conduct disorder, antisocial personality disorder and psychopathy) that is informed by developmental cognitive neuroscience. These disorders must be understood in terms of both the information-processing impairments shown by afflicted individuals and the dysfunctional neural substrates that give rise to these impairments. Three broad conceptualizations of the causes of APDs are discussed. These are: (1) an impairment in executive functioning implicating prefrontal cortex; (2) an impairment in executive emotion's processing implicating orbito-frontal cortex; (3) an impairment in emotion processing implicating the amygdala. The literature is discussed and it is concluded that: first, executive functioning impairments are not associated with the development of the APDs, although the individual's executive functioning may interact with other impairments to effect prognosis; second, impairments of executive emotion processing may be implicated in the development of the APDs, though the evidence is equivocal and the lack of any detailed theory makes firm conclusions difficult; third, the development of the APDs is associated with an impairment in emotional processing and that this impairment may be due to dysfunction within a circuit which involves the amygdala.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034464261&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034464261&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Review article

VL - 10

JO - Criminal Behaviour and Mental Health

JF - Criminal Behaviour and Mental Health

SN - 0957-9664

IS - SPEC.ISS.

ER -