Neonatal sepsis in rural India: Timing, microbiology and antibiotic resistance in a population-based prospective study in the community setting

Pinaki Panigrahi, D. S. Chandel, N. I. Hansen, N. Sharma, S. Kandefer, S. Parida, R. Satpathy, L. Pradhan, A. Mohapatra, S. S. Mohapatra, P. R. Misra, N. Banaji, J. A. Johnson, J. G. Morris, I. H. Gewolb, R. Chaudhry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine the timing and microbiology of neonatal sepsis in a population-based surveillance in the Indian community setting. Study Design: All live born infants in 223 villages of Odisha state were followed at home for 60 days. Suspect sepsis cases were referred to study hospitals for further evaluation including blood culture. Results: Of 12 622 births, 842 were admitted with suspected sepsis of whom 95% were 4 to 60 days old. Culture-confirmed incidence of sepsis was 6.7/1000 births with 51% Gram negatives (Klebsiella predominating) and 26% Gram positives (mostly Staphylococcus aureus). A very high level of resistance to penicillin and ampicillin, moderate resistance to cephalosporins and extremely low resistance to Gentamicin and Amikacin was observed. Conclusion: The bacterial burden of sepsis in the Indian community is not high. Judicious choice of empiric antibiotics, antibiotic stewardship and alternate modalities should be considered for the management or prevention of neonatal sepsis in India.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)911-921
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Perinatology
Volume37
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2017

Fingerprint

Microbial Drug Resistance
Microbiology
India
Sepsis
Prospective Studies
Population
Parturition
Population Surveillance
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Ampicillin Resistance
Penicillin Resistance
Klebsiella
Amikacin
Cephalosporins
Gentamicins
Staphylococcus aureus
Neonatal Sepsis
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Neonatal sepsis in rural India : Timing, microbiology and antibiotic resistance in a population-based prospective study in the community setting. / Panigrahi, Pinaki; Chandel, D. S.; Hansen, N. I.; Sharma, N.; Kandefer, S.; Parida, S.; Satpathy, R.; Pradhan, L.; Mohapatra, A.; Mohapatra, S. S.; Misra, P. R.; Banaji, N.; Johnson, J. A.; Morris, J. G.; Gewolb, I. H.; Chaudhry, R.

In: Journal of Perinatology, Vol. 37, No. 8, 01.08.2017, p. 911-921.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Panigrahi, P, Chandel, DS, Hansen, NI, Sharma, N, Kandefer, S, Parida, S, Satpathy, R, Pradhan, L, Mohapatra, A, Mohapatra, SS, Misra, PR, Banaji, N, Johnson, JA, Morris, JG, Gewolb, IH & Chaudhry, R 2017, 'Neonatal sepsis in rural India: Timing, microbiology and antibiotic resistance in a population-based prospective study in the community setting', Journal of Perinatology, vol. 37, no. 8, pp. 911-921. https://doi.org/10.1038/jp.2017.67
Panigrahi, Pinaki ; Chandel, D. S. ; Hansen, N. I. ; Sharma, N. ; Kandefer, S. ; Parida, S. ; Satpathy, R. ; Pradhan, L. ; Mohapatra, A. ; Mohapatra, S. S. ; Misra, P. R. ; Banaji, N. ; Johnson, J. A. ; Morris, J. G. ; Gewolb, I. H. ; Chaudhry, R. / Neonatal sepsis in rural India : Timing, microbiology and antibiotic resistance in a population-based prospective study in the community setting. In: Journal of Perinatology. 2017 ; Vol. 37, No. 8. pp. 911-921.
@article{94f9e7c1fe084cd296da0902f43ad9c5,
title = "Neonatal sepsis in rural India: Timing, microbiology and antibiotic resistance in a population-based prospective study in the community setting",
abstract = "Objective: To examine the timing and microbiology of neonatal sepsis in a population-based surveillance in the Indian community setting. Study Design: All live born infants in 223 villages of Odisha state were followed at home for 60 days. Suspect sepsis cases were referred to study hospitals for further evaluation including blood culture. Results: Of 12 622 births, 842 were admitted with suspected sepsis of whom 95{\%} were 4 to 60 days old. Culture-confirmed incidence of sepsis was 6.7/1000 births with 51{\%} Gram negatives (Klebsiella predominating) and 26{\%} Gram positives (mostly Staphylococcus aureus). A very high level of resistance to penicillin and ampicillin, moderate resistance to cephalosporins and extremely low resistance to Gentamicin and Amikacin was observed. Conclusion: The bacterial burden of sepsis in the Indian community is not high. Judicious choice of empiric antibiotics, antibiotic stewardship and alternate modalities should be considered for the management or prevention of neonatal sepsis in India.",
author = "Pinaki Panigrahi and Chandel, {D. S.} and Hansen, {N. I.} and N. Sharma and S. Kandefer and S. Parida and R. Satpathy and L. Pradhan and A. Mohapatra and Mohapatra, {S. S.} and Misra, {P. R.} and N. Banaji and Johnson, {J. A.} and Morris, {J. G.} and Gewolb, {I. H.} and R. Chaudhry",
year = "2017",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/jp.2017.67",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "37",
pages = "911--921",
journal = "Journal of Perinatology",
issn = "0743-8346",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Neonatal sepsis in rural India

T2 - Timing, microbiology and antibiotic resistance in a population-based prospective study in the community setting

AU - Panigrahi, Pinaki

AU - Chandel, D. S.

AU - Hansen, N. I.

AU - Sharma, N.

AU - Kandefer, S.

AU - Parida, S.

AU - Satpathy, R.

AU - Pradhan, L.

AU - Mohapatra, A.

AU - Mohapatra, S. S.

AU - Misra, P. R.

AU - Banaji, N.

AU - Johnson, J. A.

AU - Morris, J. G.

AU - Gewolb, I. H.

AU - Chaudhry, R.

PY - 2017/8/1

Y1 - 2017/8/1

N2 - Objective: To examine the timing and microbiology of neonatal sepsis in a population-based surveillance in the Indian community setting. Study Design: All live born infants in 223 villages of Odisha state were followed at home for 60 days. Suspect sepsis cases were referred to study hospitals for further evaluation including blood culture. Results: Of 12 622 births, 842 were admitted with suspected sepsis of whom 95% were 4 to 60 days old. Culture-confirmed incidence of sepsis was 6.7/1000 births with 51% Gram negatives (Klebsiella predominating) and 26% Gram positives (mostly Staphylococcus aureus). A very high level of resistance to penicillin and ampicillin, moderate resistance to cephalosporins and extremely low resistance to Gentamicin and Amikacin was observed. Conclusion: The bacterial burden of sepsis in the Indian community is not high. Judicious choice of empiric antibiotics, antibiotic stewardship and alternate modalities should be considered for the management or prevention of neonatal sepsis in India.

AB - Objective: To examine the timing and microbiology of neonatal sepsis in a population-based surveillance in the Indian community setting. Study Design: All live born infants in 223 villages of Odisha state were followed at home for 60 days. Suspect sepsis cases were referred to study hospitals for further evaluation including blood culture. Results: Of 12 622 births, 842 were admitted with suspected sepsis of whom 95% were 4 to 60 days old. Culture-confirmed incidence of sepsis was 6.7/1000 births with 51% Gram negatives (Klebsiella predominating) and 26% Gram positives (mostly Staphylococcus aureus). A very high level of resistance to penicillin and ampicillin, moderate resistance to cephalosporins and extremely low resistance to Gentamicin and Amikacin was observed. Conclusion: The bacterial burden of sepsis in the Indian community is not high. Judicious choice of empiric antibiotics, antibiotic stewardship and alternate modalities should be considered for the management or prevention of neonatal sepsis in India.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85028337956&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85028337956&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/jp.2017.67

DO - 10.1038/jp.2017.67

M3 - Article

C2 - 28492525

AN - SCOPUS:85028337956

VL - 37

SP - 911

EP - 921

JO - Journal of Perinatology

JF - Journal of Perinatology

SN - 0743-8346

IS - 8

ER -