Narrow grass hedge effects on nutrient transport following compost application

John E. Gilley, Bahman Eghball, David B. Marx

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The placement of stiff-stemmed grass hedges on the contour along a hillslope has been shown to decrease nutrient transport in runoff. This study was conducted to measure the effectiveness of a narrow grass hedge in reducing runoff nutrient transport from plots with a range of soil nutrient values. Composted beef cattle manure was applied at dry weights of 0, 68, 105, 142, and 178 Mg ha -1 to a silty clay loam soil and then incorporated by disking. Soil samples were collected 243 days later for analysis of water-soluble phosphorus (WSP), Bray and Kurtz No. 1 phosphorus (Bray-1 P), NO 3-N, and NH 4-N. Three 30 min simulated rainfall events, separated by 24 h intervals, were then applied. The transport of dissolved phosphorus (DP), total P (TP), NO 3-N, NH 4-N, total nitrogen (TN), runoff, and soil erosion were measured from 0.75 m wide x 4.0 m long plots. Compost application rate significantly affected soil measurements of WSP, Bray-1 P, and NO 3-N content. The transport of DP, TP, NO 3-N, NH 4-N, TN, runoff, and soil erosion was reduced significantly on the plots with a grass hedge. Mean runoff rates on the hedge and no-hedge treatments were 17 and 29 mm, and erosion rates were 0.12 and 1.46 Mg ha -1, respectively. Compost application rate significantly affected the transport of DP, TP, and NO 3-N in runoff. The experimental results indicate that stiff-stemmed grass hedges, planted at selected downslope intervals, can significantly reduce the transport of nutrients in runoff from areas with a range of soil nutrient values.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)997-1005
Number of pages9
JournalTransactions of the ASABE
Volume51
Issue number3
StatePublished - May 1 2008

Fingerprint

nutrient transport
Poaceae
Runoff
compost
Nutrients
composts
Phosphorus
runoff
Soil
grass
grasses
phosphorus
Soils
Food
nutrient
Erosion
soil nutrient
soil erosion
soil nutrients
application rate

Keywords

  • Grass filters
  • Land application
  • Manure management
  • Manure runoff
  • Nitrogen movement
  • Nutrient losses
  • Phosphorus
  • Runoff
  • Sediment detention
  • Water quality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Forestry
  • Food Science
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Soil Science

Cite this

Gilley, J. E., Eghball, B., & Marx, D. B. (2008). Narrow grass hedge effects on nutrient transport following compost application. Transactions of the ASABE, 51(3), 997-1005.

Narrow grass hedge effects on nutrient transport following compost application. / Gilley, John E.; Eghball, Bahman; Marx, David B.

In: Transactions of the ASABE, Vol. 51, No. 3, 01.05.2008, p. 997-1005.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gilley, JE, Eghball, B & Marx, DB 2008, 'Narrow grass hedge effects on nutrient transport following compost application', Transactions of the ASABE, vol. 51, no. 3, pp. 997-1005.
Gilley, John E. ; Eghball, Bahman ; Marx, David B. / Narrow grass hedge effects on nutrient transport following compost application. In: Transactions of the ASABE. 2008 ; Vol. 51, No. 3. pp. 997-1005.
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