Multiscale modeling of asphaltic pavements: Comparison with field performance and parametric analysis of design variables

Taesun You, Yong Rak Kim, Keyvan Zare Rami, Dallas N. Little

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study presents a multiscale model that concurrently links mixture-level component properties to the structural performance of asphaltic pavements. Two scales (the global scale of the pavement and the local scale of mixtures) were two-way linked in the model framework based on a thermomechanical finite-element formulation. Global and local scales were systemically represented in the model by a homogeneous pavement structure and a heterogeneous asphalt concrete mixture, respectively. A four-layer pavement structure on I-80 in Nebraska was used as an example to demonstrate the modeling. A comparison of the rutting field measurements and model predictions shows relatively good agreement. Parametric analysis of the model was then conducted to investigate the effect of the component properties (viscoelastic stiffness and fracture) and mixture microstructures on two primary pavement distresses: rutting and fatigue cracking. Because mixture heterogeneity, elastic-viscoelastic deformation, and fracture damage in mixture microstructures (local scale) are considered in predicting pavement performance with damage (global scale), typical distress types in asphaltic pavements can be directly examined as a function of the core design-related variables, such as mixture component properties, mixture designs, pavement layer configurations, and traffic loading conditions. Furthermore, the model is expected to significantly reduce the experimental costs and time required to design pavement structures because it uses only the properties of mixture components, not the test results of entire mixtures. Although the modeling approach is in an early stage and requires further improvements before practical implementation, its simulation results show that it has great potential for advancing materials selection, mixture design, and mechanistic pavement analysis/design.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number04018012
JournalJournal of Transportation Engineering Part B: Pavements
Volume144
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2018

Fingerprint

Pavements
performance
damages
fatigue
Microstructure
Asphalt concrete
traffic
Concrete mixtures
Elastic deformation
simulation
costs
Stiffness
Fatigue of materials

Keywords

  • Asphaltic pavement
  • Cohesive zone
  • Fracture
  • Multiscale modeling
  • Performance prediction
  • Viscoelasticity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Transportation

Cite this

Multiscale modeling of asphaltic pavements : Comparison with field performance and parametric analysis of design variables. / You, Taesun; Kim, Yong Rak; Rami, Keyvan Zare; Little, Dallas N.

In: Journal of Transportation Engineering Part B: Pavements, Vol. 144, No. 2, 04018012, 01.06.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{472d0857463e4a74ab66a250f3573de2,
title = "Multiscale modeling of asphaltic pavements: Comparison with field performance and parametric analysis of design variables",
abstract = "This study presents a multiscale model that concurrently links mixture-level component properties to the structural performance of asphaltic pavements. Two scales (the global scale of the pavement and the local scale of mixtures) were two-way linked in the model framework based on a thermomechanical finite-element formulation. Global and local scales were systemically represented in the model by a homogeneous pavement structure and a heterogeneous asphalt concrete mixture, respectively. A four-layer pavement structure on I-80 in Nebraska was used as an example to demonstrate the modeling. A comparison of the rutting field measurements and model predictions shows relatively good agreement. Parametric analysis of the model was then conducted to investigate the effect of the component properties (viscoelastic stiffness and fracture) and mixture microstructures on two primary pavement distresses: rutting and fatigue cracking. Because mixture heterogeneity, elastic-viscoelastic deformation, and fracture damage in mixture microstructures (local scale) are considered in predicting pavement performance with damage (global scale), typical distress types in asphaltic pavements can be directly examined as a function of the core design-related variables, such as mixture component properties, mixture designs, pavement layer configurations, and traffic loading conditions. Furthermore, the model is expected to significantly reduce the experimental costs and time required to design pavement structures because it uses only the properties of mixture components, not the test results of entire mixtures. Although the modeling approach is in an early stage and requires further improvements before practical implementation, its simulation results show that it has great potential for advancing materials selection, mixture design, and mechanistic pavement analysis/design.",
keywords = "Asphaltic pavement, Cohesive zone, Fracture, Multiscale modeling, Performance prediction, Viscoelasticity",
author = "Taesun You and Kim, {Yong Rak} and Rami, {Keyvan Zare} and Little, {Dallas N.}",
year = "2018",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1061/JPEODX.0000040",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "144",
journal = "Journal of Transportation Engineering Part B: Pavements",
issn = "2573-5438",
publisher = "American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Multiscale modeling of asphaltic pavements

T2 - Comparison with field performance and parametric analysis of design variables

AU - You, Taesun

AU - Kim, Yong Rak

AU - Rami, Keyvan Zare

AU - Little, Dallas N.

PY - 2018/6/1

Y1 - 2018/6/1

N2 - This study presents a multiscale model that concurrently links mixture-level component properties to the structural performance of asphaltic pavements. Two scales (the global scale of the pavement and the local scale of mixtures) were two-way linked in the model framework based on a thermomechanical finite-element formulation. Global and local scales were systemically represented in the model by a homogeneous pavement structure and a heterogeneous asphalt concrete mixture, respectively. A four-layer pavement structure on I-80 in Nebraska was used as an example to demonstrate the modeling. A comparison of the rutting field measurements and model predictions shows relatively good agreement. Parametric analysis of the model was then conducted to investigate the effect of the component properties (viscoelastic stiffness and fracture) and mixture microstructures on two primary pavement distresses: rutting and fatigue cracking. Because mixture heterogeneity, elastic-viscoelastic deformation, and fracture damage in mixture microstructures (local scale) are considered in predicting pavement performance with damage (global scale), typical distress types in asphaltic pavements can be directly examined as a function of the core design-related variables, such as mixture component properties, mixture designs, pavement layer configurations, and traffic loading conditions. Furthermore, the model is expected to significantly reduce the experimental costs and time required to design pavement structures because it uses only the properties of mixture components, not the test results of entire mixtures. Although the modeling approach is in an early stage and requires further improvements before practical implementation, its simulation results show that it has great potential for advancing materials selection, mixture design, and mechanistic pavement analysis/design.

AB - This study presents a multiscale model that concurrently links mixture-level component properties to the structural performance of asphaltic pavements. Two scales (the global scale of the pavement and the local scale of mixtures) were two-way linked in the model framework based on a thermomechanical finite-element formulation. Global and local scales were systemically represented in the model by a homogeneous pavement structure and a heterogeneous asphalt concrete mixture, respectively. A four-layer pavement structure on I-80 in Nebraska was used as an example to demonstrate the modeling. A comparison of the rutting field measurements and model predictions shows relatively good agreement. Parametric analysis of the model was then conducted to investigate the effect of the component properties (viscoelastic stiffness and fracture) and mixture microstructures on two primary pavement distresses: rutting and fatigue cracking. Because mixture heterogeneity, elastic-viscoelastic deformation, and fracture damage in mixture microstructures (local scale) are considered in predicting pavement performance with damage (global scale), typical distress types in asphaltic pavements can be directly examined as a function of the core design-related variables, such as mixture component properties, mixture designs, pavement layer configurations, and traffic loading conditions. Furthermore, the model is expected to significantly reduce the experimental costs and time required to design pavement structures because it uses only the properties of mixture components, not the test results of entire mixtures. Although the modeling approach is in an early stage and requires further improvements before practical implementation, its simulation results show that it has great potential for advancing materials selection, mixture design, and mechanistic pavement analysis/design.

KW - Asphaltic pavement

KW - Cohesive zone

KW - Fracture

KW - Multiscale modeling

KW - Performance prediction

KW - Viscoelasticity

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85044942897&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85044942897&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1061/JPEODX.0000040

DO - 10.1061/JPEODX.0000040

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85044942897

VL - 144

JO - Journal of Transportation Engineering Part B: Pavements

JF - Journal of Transportation Engineering Part B: Pavements

SN - 2573-5438

IS - 2

M1 - 04018012

ER -