Multiple two-dimensional displays as an alternative to three-dimensional displays in telerobotic tasks

Ha Park Sung Ha Park, J. C. Woldstad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study a multiple-view two-dimensional (2D) display was compared with a three-dimensional (3D) monocular display and a 3D stereoscopic display using a simulated telerobotic task. As visual aids, three new types of visual enhancement cues were provided and evaluated for each display type. The results showed that the multiple-view 2D display was superior to the 3D monocular and the 3D stereoscopic display in the absence of the visual enhancement depth cues. When participants were provided with the proposed visual enhancement cues, the stereoscopic and monocular displays became equivalent to the multiple-view 2D display. Actual or potential applications of this study include the design of visual displays for teleoperation systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)592-603
Number of pages12
JournalHuman Factors
Volume42
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 1 2000

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Robotics
Cues
Display devices
Audiovisual Aids
Remote control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics
  • Applied Psychology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Multiple two-dimensional displays as an alternative to three-dimensional displays in telerobotic tasks. / Sung Ha Park, Ha Park; Woldstad, J. C.

In: Human Factors, Vol. 42, No. 4, 01.12.2000, p. 592-603.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sung Ha Park, Ha Park ; Woldstad, J. C. / Multiple two-dimensional displays as an alternative to three-dimensional displays in telerobotic tasks. In: Human Factors. 2000 ; Vol. 42, No. 4. pp. 592-603.
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