Multimorbidity redefined

Prospective health outcomes and the cumulative effect of co-occurring conditions

Siran M. Koroukian, David F Warner, Cynthia Owusu, Charles W. Given

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction Multimorbidity is common among middle-aged and older adults; however the prospective effects of multimorbidity on health outcomes (health status, major health decline, and mortality) have not been fully explored. This study addresses this gap in the literature. Methods We used self-reported data from the 2008 and 2010 Health and Retirement Study. Our study population included 13,232 adults aged 50 or older. Our measure of baseline multimorbidity in 2008 was based on the occurrence or co-occurrence of chronic conditions, functional limitations, and/or geriatric syndromes, as follows: MM0, no chronic conditions, functional limitations, or geriatric syndromes; MM1, occurrence (but no co-occurrence) of chronic conditions, functional limitations, or geriatric syndromes; MM2, co-occurrence of any 2 of chronic conditions, functional limitations, or geriatric syndromes; and MM3, co-occurrence of all 3 of chronic conditions, functional limitations, and geriatric syndromes. Outcomes in 2010 included fair or poor health status, major health decline, and mortality. Results All 3 outcomes were significantly associated with multimorbidity. Compared with MM0 (respectively for fair or poor health and major health decline), the adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and 95% confidence intervals were as follows: 2.61 (1.79-3.78) and 2.20 (1.42-3.41) for MM1; 7.49 (5.20-10.77) and 3.70 (2.40-5.71) for MM2; and 22.66 (15.64-32.83) and 4.72 (3.03-7.37) for MM3. Multimorbidity was also associated with mortality: an adult classified as MM3 was nearly 12 times (AOR, 11.87 [5.72-24.62]) as likely as an adult classified as MM0 to die within 2 years. Conclusion Given the strong and significant association between multimorbidity and prospective health status, major health decline, and mortality, multimorbidity may be used - both in clinical practice and in research - to identify older adults with heightened vulnerability for adverse outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalPreventing chronic disease
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Comorbidity
Geriatrics
Health
Health Status
Mortality
Odds Ratio
Retirement
Confidence Intervals
Research
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Multimorbidity redefined : Prospective health outcomes and the cumulative effect of co-occurring conditions. / Koroukian, Siran M.; Warner, David F; Owusu, Cynthia; Given, Charles W.

In: Preventing chronic disease, Vol. 12, No. 4, 2015, p. 1-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{16977f3c931643289ae78e4fb2914de4,
title = "Multimorbidity redefined: Prospective health outcomes and the cumulative effect of co-occurring conditions",
abstract = "Introduction Multimorbidity is common among middle-aged and older adults; however the prospective effects of multimorbidity on health outcomes (health status, major health decline, and mortality) have not been fully explored. This study addresses this gap in the literature. Methods We used self-reported data from the 2008 and 2010 Health and Retirement Study. Our study population included 13,232 adults aged 50 or older. Our measure of baseline multimorbidity in 2008 was based on the occurrence or co-occurrence of chronic conditions, functional limitations, and/or geriatric syndromes, as follows: MM0, no chronic conditions, functional limitations, or geriatric syndromes; MM1, occurrence (but no co-occurrence) of chronic conditions, functional limitations, or geriatric syndromes; MM2, co-occurrence of any 2 of chronic conditions, functional limitations, or geriatric syndromes; and MM3, co-occurrence of all 3 of chronic conditions, functional limitations, and geriatric syndromes. Outcomes in 2010 included fair or poor health status, major health decline, and mortality. Results All 3 outcomes were significantly associated with multimorbidity. Compared with MM0 (respectively for fair or poor health and major health decline), the adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and 95{\%} confidence intervals were as follows: 2.61 (1.79-3.78) and 2.20 (1.42-3.41) for MM1; 7.49 (5.20-10.77) and 3.70 (2.40-5.71) for MM2; and 22.66 (15.64-32.83) and 4.72 (3.03-7.37) for MM3. Multimorbidity was also associated with mortality: an adult classified as MM3 was nearly 12 times (AOR, 11.87 [5.72-24.62]) as likely as an adult classified as MM0 to die within 2 years. Conclusion Given the strong and significant association between multimorbidity and prospective health status, major health decline, and mortality, multimorbidity may be used - both in clinical practice and in research - to identify older adults with heightened vulnerability for adverse outcomes.",
author = "Koroukian, {Siran M.} and Warner, {David F} and Cynthia Owusu and Given, {Charles W.}",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.5888/pcd12.140478",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "12",
pages = "1--12",
journal = "Preventing chronic disease",
issn = "1545-1151",
publisher = "U.S. Department of Health and Human Services",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Multimorbidity redefined

T2 - Prospective health outcomes and the cumulative effect of co-occurring conditions

AU - Koroukian, Siran M.

AU - Warner, David F

AU - Owusu, Cynthia

AU - Given, Charles W.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Introduction Multimorbidity is common among middle-aged and older adults; however the prospective effects of multimorbidity on health outcomes (health status, major health decline, and mortality) have not been fully explored. This study addresses this gap in the literature. Methods We used self-reported data from the 2008 and 2010 Health and Retirement Study. Our study population included 13,232 adults aged 50 or older. Our measure of baseline multimorbidity in 2008 was based on the occurrence or co-occurrence of chronic conditions, functional limitations, and/or geriatric syndromes, as follows: MM0, no chronic conditions, functional limitations, or geriatric syndromes; MM1, occurrence (but no co-occurrence) of chronic conditions, functional limitations, or geriatric syndromes; MM2, co-occurrence of any 2 of chronic conditions, functional limitations, or geriatric syndromes; and MM3, co-occurrence of all 3 of chronic conditions, functional limitations, and geriatric syndromes. Outcomes in 2010 included fair or poor health status, major health decline, and mortality. Results All 3 outcomes were significantly associated with multimorbidity. Compared with MM0 (respectively for fair or poor health and major health decline), the adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and 95% confidence intervals were as follows: 2.61 (1.79-3.78) and 2.20 (1.42-3.41) for MM1; 7.49 (5.20-10.77) and 3.70 (2.40-5.71) for MM2; and 22.66 (15.64-32.83) and 4.72 (3.03-7.37) for MM3. Multimorbidity was also associated with mortality: an adult classified as MM3 was nearly 12 times (AOR, 11.87 [5.72-24.62]) as likely as an adult classified as MM0 to die within 2 years. Conclusion Given the strong and significant association between multimorbidity and prospective health status, major health decline, and mortality, multimorbidity may be used - both in clinical practice and in research - to identify older adults with heightened vulnerability for adverse outcomes.

AB - Introduction Multimorbidity is common among middle-aged and older adults; however the prospective effects of multimorbidity on health outcomes (health status, major health decline, and mortality) have not been fully explored. This study addresses this gap in the literature. Methods We used self-reported data from the 2008 and 2010 Health and Retirement Study. Our study population included 13,232 adults aged 50 or older. Our measure of baseline multimorbidity in 2008 was based on the occurrence or co-occurrence of chronic conditions, functional limitations, and/or geriatric syndromes, as follows: MM0, no chronic conditions, functional limitations, or geriatric syndromes; MM1, occurrence (but no co-occurrence) of chronic conditions, functional limitations, or geriatric syndromes; MM2, co-occurrence of any 2 of chronic conditions, functional limitations, or geriatric syndromes; and MM3, co-occurrence of all 3 of chronic conditions, functional limitations, and geriatric syndromes. Outcomes in 2010 included fair or poor health status, major health decline, and mortality. Results All 3 outcomes were significantly associated with multimorbidity. Compared with MM0 (respectively for fair or poor health and major health decline), the adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and 95% confidence intervals were as follows: 2.61 (1.79-3.78) and 2.20 (1.42-3.41) for MM1; 7.49 (5.20-10.77) and 3.70 (2.40-5.71) for MM2; and 22.66 (15.64-32.83) and 4.72 (3.03-7.37) for MM3. Multimorbidity was also associated with mortality: an adult classified as MM3 was nearly 12 times (AOR, 11.87 [5.72-24.62]) as likely as an adult classified as MM0 to die within 2 years. Conclusion Given the strong and significant association between multimorbidity and prospective health status, major health decline, and mortality, multimorbidity may be used - both in clinical practice and in research - to identify older adults with heightened vulnerability for adverse outcomes.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84928595613&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84928595613&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.5888/pcd12.140478

DO - 10.5888/pcd12.140478

M3 - Article

VL - 12

SP - 1

EP - 12

JO - Preventing chronic disease

JF - Preventing chronic disease

SN - 1545-1151

IS - 4

ER -