Motor vehicle deaths

A rural epidemic

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine the magnitude of the discrepancy in injury death rates between urban and rural counties and which types of injury deaths contribute most to this discrepancy. Design: A review of Nebraska death certificates over the period 1985-1989 was undertaken. Counties were divided into four groups according to population. Group I: urban counties (n = 3); group II: counties with a town of greater than 10, 000 (n = 9); group III: counties with a total population of greater than 10, 000 (n = 19); group IV: counties with a total population of less than 10, 000 (n = 62). Age- adjusted death rates for heart disease, cancer, cerebrovascular disease, pneumonia, and injury were tabulated. Injury deaths were further categorized by intentional injury (homicide, suicide), and unintentional injury (motor vehicle-related, falls, drownings, poisoning, farm machinery-related, choking, firearms-related, fire-related and burns). Interventions: None. Results: Age-adjusted death rates per 100, 000 population (with 95% confidence intervals) in group IV were lower than in group I for heart disease: 209 (193.9-224.1) vs. 227.4 (216.3-238.5); cancer: 135.9 (123.7-148.1) vs. 176.3 (166.6-186.0); cerebrovascular disease: 39.9 (33.3-46.5) vs. 44.6 (39.7-49.5); pneumonia: 19.6 (15.0-24.2) vs. 23.4 (19.8-27.0); and intentional injury deaths: 13.3 (9.5-17.0) vs. 15.1 (12.2-18.0). However, age-adjusted unintentional injury death rates were 54.2% higher in group IV than in group I: 42.7 (35.9-49.5) vs. 27.7 (23.8-31.6). Motor vehicle-related death rates were 93% higher: 23.3 (18.2-28.4) vs. 12.1 (9.5- 14.7); and farm machinery-related deaths were 1250% higher: 2.7 (1.0-4.4) vs. 0.2 (-0.1-0.5). Conclusion: Age-adjusted unintentional injury death rates are higher in the rural counties of Nebraska, even though death rates for the four other leading causes of death (heart disease, cancer, cerebral vascular disease, and pneumonia) and intentional injury are lower. Although farm machinery-related deaths have the largest percentage difference between rural and urban counties, motor vehicle-related deaths are the major contributor to the unintentional injury death rate discrepancy in rural Nebraska.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)717-719
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care
Volume35
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

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Motor Vehicles
Wounds and Injuries
Mortality
Cerebrovascular Disorders
Heart Diseases
Pneumonia
Heart Neoplasms
Population
Death Certificates
Homicide
Firearms
Airway Obstruction
Burns
Vascular Diseases
Poisoning
Suicide
Cause of Death
Confidence Intervals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Motor vehicle deaths : A rural epidemic. / Muelleman, Robert Leo; Walker, Richard; Edney, J. A.

In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care, Vol. 35, No. 5, 01.01.1993, p. 717-719.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Motor vehicle deaths: A rural epidemic",
abstract = "Objective: To determine the magnitude of the discrepancy in injury death rates between urban and rural counties and which types of injury deaths contribute most to this discrepancy. Design: A review of Nebraska death certificates over the period 1985-1989 was undertaken. Counties were divided into four groups according to population. Group I: urban counties (n = 3); group II: counties with a town of greater than 10, 000 (n = 9); group III: counties with a total population of greater than 10, 000 (n = 19); group IV: counties with a total population of less than 10, 000 (n = 62). Age- adjusted death rates for heart disease, cancer, cerebrovascular disease, pneumonia, and injury were tabulated. Injury deaths were further categorized by intentional injury (homicide, suicide), and unintentional injury (motor vehicle-related, falls, drownings, poisoning, farm machinery-related, choking, firearms-related, fire-related and burns). Interventions: None. Results: Age-adjusted death rates per 100, 000 population (with 95{\%} confidence intervals) in group IV were lower than in group I for heart disease: 209 (193.9-224.1) vs. 227.4 (216.3-238.5); cancer: 135.9 (123.7-148.1) vs. 176.3 (166.6-186.0); cerebrovascular disease: 39.9 (33.3-46.5) vs. 44.6 (39.7-49.5); pneumonia: 19.6 (15.0-24.2) vs. 23.4 (19.8-27.0); and intentional injury deaths: 13.3 (9.5-17.0) vs. 15.1 (12.2-18.0). However, age-adjusted unintentional injury death rates were 54.2{\%} higher in group IV than in group I: 42.7 (35.9-49.5) vs. 27.7 (23.8-31.6). Motor vehicle-related death rates were 93{\%} higher: 23.3 (18.2-28.4) vs. 12.1 (9.5- 14.7); and farm machinery-related deaths were 1250{\%} higher: 2.7 (1.0-4.4) vs. 0.2 (-0.1-0.5). Conclusion: Age-adjusted unintentional injury death rates are higher in the rural counties of Nebraska, even though death rates for the four other leading causes of death (heart disease, cancer, cerebral vascular disease, and pneumonia) and intentional injury are lower. Although farm machinery-related deaths have the largest percentage difference between rural and urban counties, motor vehicle-related deaths are the major contributor to the unintentional injury death rate discrepancy in rural Nebraska.",
author = "Muelleman, {Robert Leo} and Richard Walker and Edney, {J. A.}",
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AU - Edney, J. A.

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N2 - Objective: To determine the magnitude of the discrepancy in injury death rates between urban and rural counties and which types of injury deaths contribute most to this discrepancy. Design: A review of Nebraska death certificates over the period 1985-1989 was undertaken. Counties were divided into four groups according to population. Group I: urban counties (n = 3); group II: counties with a town of greater than 10, 000 (n = 9); group III: counties with a total population of greater than 10, 000 (n = 19); group IV: counties with a total population of less than 10, 000 (n = 62). Age- adjusted death rates for heart disease, cancer, cerebrovascular disease, pneumonia, and injury were tabulated. Injury deaths were further categorized by intentional injury (homicide, suicide), and unintentional injury (motor vehicle-related, falls, drownings, poisoning, farm machinery-related, choking, firearms-related, fire-related and burns). Interventions: None. Results: Age-adjusted death rates per 100, 000 population (with 95% confidence intervals) in group IV were lower than in group I for heart disease: 209 (193.9-224.1) vs. 227.4 (216.3-238.5); cancer: 135.9 (123.7-148.1) vs. 176.3 (166.6-186.0); cerebrovascular disease: 39.9 (33.3-46.5) vs. 44.6 (39.7-49.5); pneumonia: 19.6 (15.0-24.2) vs. 23.4 (19.8-27.0); and intentional injury deaths: 13.3 (9.5-17.0) vs. 15.1 (12.2-18.0). However, age-adjusted unintentional injury death rates were 54.2% higher in group IV than in group I: 42.7 (35.9-49.5) vs. 27.7 (23.8-31.6). Motor vehicle-related death rates were 93% higher: 23.3 (18.2-28.4) vs. 12.1 (9.5- 14.7); and farm machinery-related deaths were 1250% higher: 2.7 (1.0-4.4) vs. 0.2 (-0.1-0.5). Conclusion: Age-adjusted unintentional injury death rates are higher in the rural counties of Nebraska, even though death rates for the four other leading causes of death (heart disease, cancer, cerebral vascular disease, and pneumonia) and intentional injury are lower. Although farm machinery-related deaths have the largest percentage difference between rural and urban counties, motor vehicle-related deaths are the major contributor to the unintentional injury death rate discrepancy in rural Nebraska.

AB - Objective: To determine the magnitude of the discrepancy in injury death rates between urban and rural counties and which types of injury deaths contribute most to this discrepancy. Design: A review of Nebraska death certificates over the period 1985-1989 was undertaken. Counties were divided into four groups according to population. Group I: urban counties (n = 3); group II: counties with a town of greater than 10, 000 (n = 9); group III: counties with a total population of greater than 10, 000 (n = 19); group IV: counties with a total population of less than 10, 000 (n = 62). Age- adjusted death rates for heart disease, cancer, cerebrovascular disease, pneumonia, and injury were tabulated. Injury deaths were further categorized by intentional injury (homicide, suicide), and unintentional injury (motor vehicle-related, falls, drownings, poisoning, farm machinery-related, choking, firearms-related, fire-related and burns). Interventions: None. Results: Age-adjusted death rates per 100, 000 population (with 95% confidence intervals) in group IV were lower than in group I for heart disease: 209 (193.9-224.1) vs. 227.4 (216.3-238.5); cancer: 135.9 (123.7-148.1) vs. 176.3 (166.6-186.0); cerebrovascular disease: 39.9 (33.3-46.5) vs. 44.6 (39.7-49.5); pneumonia: 19.6 (15.0-24.2) vs. 23.4 (19.8-27.0); and intentional injury deaths: 13.3 (9.5-17.0) vs. 15.1 (12.2-18.0). However, age-adjusted unintentional injury death rates were 54.2% higher in group IV than in group I: 42.7 (35.9-49.5) vs. 27.7 (23.8-31.6). Motor vehicle-related death rates were 93% higher: 23.3 (18.2-28.4) vs. 12.1 (9.5- 14.7); and farm machinery-related deaths were 1250% higher: 2.7 (1.0-4.4) vs. 0.2 (-0.1-0.5). Conclusion: Age-adjusted unintentional injury death rates are higher in the rural counties of Nebraska, even though death rates for the four other leading causes of death (heart disease, cancer, cerebral vascular disease, and pneumonia) and intentional injury are lower. Although farm machinery-related deaths have the largest percentage difference between rural and urban counties, motor vehicle-related deaths are the major contributor to the unintentional injury death rate discrepancy in rural Nebraska.

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