Mother-child bookreading in low-income families: Correlates and outcomes during the first three years of life

Helen Raikes, Gayle Luze, Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Hilary A Raikes, Barbara Alexander Pan, Catherine S. Tamis-LeMonda, Jill Constantine, Louisa Banks Tarullo, Eileen T. Rodriguez

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

307 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

About half of 2,581 low-income mothers reported reading daily to their children. At 14 months, the odds of reading daily increased by the child being firstborn or female. At 24 and 36 months, these odds increased by maternal verbal ability or education and by the child being firstborn or of Early Head Start status. White mothers read more than did Hispanic or African American mothers. For English-speaking children, concurrent reading was associated with vocabulary and comprehension at 14 months, and with vocabulary and cognitive development at 24 months. A pattern of daily reading over the 3 data points for English-speaking children and daily reading at any 1 data point for Spanish-speaking children predicted children's language and cognition at 36 months. Path analyses suggest reciprocal and snowballing relations between maternal bookreading and children's vocabulary.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)924-953
Number of pages30
JournalChild development
Volume77
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2006

Fingerprint

low income
Mothers
Reading
Vocabulary
speaking
vocabulary
reproductive behavior
Child Language
Aptitude
Hispanic Americans
cognitive development
African Americans
Cognition
cognition
comprehension
Education
ability
language
education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Mother-child bookreading in low-income families : Correlates and outcomes during the first three years of life. / Raikes, Helen; Luze, Gayle; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Raikes, Hilary A; Pan, Barbara Alexander; Tamis-LeMonda, Catherine S.; Constantine, Jill; Tarullo, Louisa Banks; Rodriguez, Eileen T.

In: Child development, Vol. 77, No. 4, 01.07.2006, p. 924-953.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Raikes, H, Luze, G, Brooks-Gunn, J, Raikes, HA, Pan, BA, Tamis-LeMonda, CS, Constantine, J, Tarullo, LB & Rodriguez, ET 2006, 'Mother-child bookreading in low-income families: Correlates and outcomes during the first three years of life', Child development, vol. 77, no. 4, pp. 924-953. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2006.00911.x
Raikes, Helen ; Luze, Gayle ; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne ; Raikes, Hilary A ; Pan, Barbara Alexander ; Tamis-LeMonda, Catherine S. ; Constantine, Jill ; Tarullo, Louisa Banks ; Rodriguez, Eileen T. / Mother-child bookreading in low-income families : Correlates and outcomes during the first three years of life. In: Child development. 2006 ; Vol. 77, No. 4. pp. 924-953.
@article{91566122bd834dac96f9d213143e54bb,
title = "Mother-child bookreading in low-income families: Correlates and outcomes during the first three years of life",
abstract = "About half of 2,581 low-income mothers reported reading daily to their children. At 14 months, the odds of reading daily increased by the child being firstborn or female. At 24 and 36 months, these odds increased by maternal verbal ability or education and by the child being firstborn or of Early Head Start status. White mothers read more than did Hispanic or African American mothers. For English-speaking children, concurrent reading was associated with vocabulary and comprehension at 14 months, and with vocabulary and cognitive development at 24 months. A pattern of daily reading over the 3 data points for English-speaking children and daily reading at any 1 data point for Spanish-speaking children predicted children's language and cognition at 36 months. Path analyses suggest reciprocal and snowballing relations between maternal bookreading and children's vocabulary.",
author = "Helen Raikes and Gayle Luze and Jeanne Brooks-Gunn and Raikes, {Hilary A} and Pan, {Barbara Alexander} and Tamis-LeMonda, {Catherine S.} and Jill Constantine and Tarullo, {Louisa Banks} and Rodriguez, {Eileen T.}",
year = "2006",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1467-8624.2006.00911.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "77",
pages = "924--953",
journal = "Child Development",
issn = "0009-3920",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mother-child bookreading in low-income families

T2 - Correlates and outcomes during the first three years of life

AU - Raikes, Helen

AU - Luze, Gayle

AU - Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

AU - Raikes, Hilary A

AU - Pan, Barbara Alexander

AU - Tamis-LeMonda, Catherine S.

AU - Constantine, Jill

AU - Tarullo, Louisa Banks

AU - Rodriguez, Eileen T.

PY - 2006/7/1

Y1 - 2006/7/1

N2 - About half of 2,581 low-income mothers reported reading daily to their children. At 14 months, the odds of reading daily increased by the child being firstborn or female. At 24 and 36 months, these odds increased by maternal verbal ability or education and by the child being firstborn or of Early Head Start status. White mothers read more than did Hispanic or African American mothers. For English-speaking children, concurrent reading was associated with vocabulary and comprehension at 14 months, and with vocabulary and cognitive development at 24 months. A pattern of daily reading over the 3 data points for English-speaking children and daily reading at any 1 data point for Spanish-speaking children predicted children's language and cognition at 36 months. Path analyses suggest reciprocal and snowballing relations between maternal bookreading and children's vocabulary.

AB - About half of 2,581 low-income mothers reported reading daily to their children. At 14 months, the odds of reading daily increased by the child being firstborn or female. At 24 and 36 months, these odds increased by maternal verbal ability or education and by the child being firstborn or of Early Head Start status. White mothers read more than did Hispanic or African American mothers. For English-speaking children, concurrent reading was associated with vocabulary and comprehension at 14 months, and with vocabulary and cognitive development at 24 months. A pattern of daily reading over the 3 data points for English-speaking children and daily reading at any 1 data point for Spanish-speaking children predicted children's language and cognition at 36 months. Path analyses suggest reciprocal and snowballing relations between maternal bookreading and children's vocabulary.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33746365821&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33746365821&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1467-8624.2006.00911.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1467-8624.2006.00911.x

M3 - Review article

C2 - 16942498

AN - SCOPUS:33746365821

VL - 77

SP - 924

EP - 953

JO - Child Development

JF - Child Development

SN - 0009-3920

IS - 4

ER -