Mortality in fibromyalgia

A study of 8,186 patients over thirty-five years

Frederick Wolfe, Afton L. Hassett, Brian Walitt, Kaleb D Michaud

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine if mortality is increased among patients diagnosed as having fibromyalgia. Methods: We studied 8,186 fibromyalgia patients seen between 1974 and 2009 in 3 settings: all fibromyalgia patients in a clinical practice, patients participating in the US National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases (NDB), and patients invited to participate in the NDB who refused participation. Internal controls included 10,087 patients with osteoarthritis. Deaths were determined by multiple source communication, and all patients were also screened in the US National Death Index (NDI). We calculated standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) based on age- and sex-stratified US population data, after adjustment for NDI nonresponse. Results: There were 539 deaths, and the overall SMR was 0.90 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.61-1.26). Among 1,665 clinic patients, the SMR was 0.92 (95% CI 0.81-1.05). Sensitivity analyses varying the rate of NDI nonidentification did not alter the nonassociation. Adjusted for age and sex, the hazard ratio for fibromyalgia compared with osteoarthritis was 1.05 (95% CI 0.94-1.17). The standardized mortality odds ratio (OR) compared with the US general population was increased for suicide (OR 3.31, 95% CI 2.15-5.11) and for accidental deaths (OR 1.45, 95% CI 1.02- 2.06), but not for malignancy. Conclusion: Mortality does not appear to be increased in patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia, but the risk of death from suicide and accidents was increased.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)94-101
Number of pages8
JournalArthritis Care and Research
Volume63
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

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Fibromyalgia
Mortality
Confidence Intervals
Odds Ratio
Osteoarthritis
Suicide
Sex Ratio
Rheumatic Diseases
Population
Accidents
Research Design
Communication
Databases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Mortality in fibromyalgia : A study of 8,186 patients over thirty-five years. / Wolfe, Frederick; Hassett, Afton L.; Walitt, Brian; Michaud, Kaleb D.

In: Arthritis Care and Research, Vol. 63, No. 1, 01.01.2011, p. 94-101.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wolfe, Frederick ; Hassett, Afton L. ; Walitt, Brian ; Michaud, Kaleb D. / Mortality in fibromyalgia : A study of 8,186 patients over thirty-five years. In: Arthritis Care and Research. 2011 ; Vol. 63, No. 1. pp. 94-101.
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