Morbidity and mortality patterns in HIV-1 seropositive/ seronegative women in Kampala and Harare during pregnancy and in the subsequent two years.

M. T. Mbizvo, F. A. Mmiro, J. Kasule, D. Bagenda, K. Mahomed, K. Nathoo, F. Mirembe, R. Choto, C. Nakabiito, C. M. Ndugwa, O. Meirik

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To compare birth outcomes, hospital admissions and mortality amongst HIV-1 seropositive and HIV-1 seronegative pregnant women in Kampala, Uganda and Harare, Zimbabwe. DESIGN: In Kampala and Harare about 400 HIV-1 seropositive and 400 HIV-1 seronegative pregnant women were recruited at initial visit for antenatal care into a prospective study and followed for two years after delivery. The women were classified as HIV-1 seropositive at recruitment if initial and second ELISA tests were positive and confirmed by Western Blot assay. Data on demographic, reproductive, contraceptive and medical histories were obtained using a comprehensive questionnaire at entry, 32 and 36 weeks gestation, at delivery and at six, 12, and 24 months post delivery. In addition, a physical examination and various blood tests were performed at each antenatal and post natal visit. RESULTS: During the two years after delivery, HIV-1 seropositive women had higher hospital admission and death rates than HIV-1 seronegative women. HIV-1 seropositive mothers had a two-fold increase in risk of being admitted to hospital (Kampala: RR = 2.09; 95% CI = 0.95 to 4.59; Harare: RR = 1.98; 95% CI = 1.13 to 3.45). In the six weeks after delivery eight deaths occurred, six of which were among HIV-1 seropositive women and in the period from six weeks to two years after delivery, 53 deaths occurred, 51 of which were among HIV-1 seropositive women (Kampala: RR = 17.7; 95% CI = 4.3 to 73.2; Harare: RR = 10.0; 95% CI = 2.3 to 43.1). However, there was no difference in hospital admission rates between HIV-1 seropositive and seronegative women during pregnancy itself and there was only one death during that period (in a HIV-1 seronegative woman). There was no difference in the frequency of complications of delivery between HIV-1 seropositive and HIV-1 seronegative women and the outcome of births were also similar. CONCLUSIONS: A significant number of HIV-1 positive pregnant women presented at both Harare and Kampala although there was no difference in the number of hospital admissions or mortality between HIV-1 seropositive and HIV-1 seronegative women during pregnancy. Although there were no differences in complications during pregnancy or outcome at delivery, in the two years after delivery, HIV-1 seropositive women in both centres were at increased risk of being admitted to hospital and of dying.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)91-97
Number of pages7
JournalThe Central African journal of medicine
Volume51
Issue number9-10
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

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HIV-1
Morbidity
Pregnancy
Mortality
Pregnant Women
Parturition
Zimbabwe
Reproductive History
Uganda
Prenatal Care
Hematologic Tests
Pregnancy Outcome
Hospital Mortality
Physical Examination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Morbidity and mortality patterns in HIV-1 seropositive/ seronegative women in Kampala and Harare during pregnancy and in the subsequent two years. / Mbizvo, M. T.; Mmiro, F. A.; Kasule, J.; Bagenda, D.; Mahomed, K.; Nathoo, K.; Mirembe, F.; Choto, R.; Nakabiito, C.; Ndugwa, C. M.; Meirik, O.

In: The Central African journal of medicine, Vol. 51, No. 9-10, 01.01.2005, p. 91-97.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mbizvo, MT, Mmiro, FA, Kasule, J, Bagenda, D, Mahomed, K, Nathoo, K, Mirembe, F, Choto, R, Nakabiito, C, Ndugwa, CM & Meirik, O 2005, 'Morbidity and mortality patterns in HIV-1 seropositive/ seronegative women in Kampala and Harare during pregnancy and in the subsequent two years.', The Central African journal of medicine, vol. 51, no. 9-10, pp. 91-97.
Mbizvo, M. T. ; Mmiro, F. A. ; Kasule, J. ; Bagenda, D. ; Mahomed, K. ; Nathoo, K. ; Mirembe, F. ; Choto, R. ; Nakabiito, C. ; Ndugwa, C. M. ; Meirik, O. / Morbidity and mortality patterns in HIV-1 seropositive/ seronegative women in Kampala and Harare during pregnancy and in the subsequent two years. In: The Central African journal of medicine. 2005 ; Vol. 51, No. 9-10. pp. 91-97.
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title = "Morbidity and mortality patterns in HIV-1 seropositive/ seronegative women in Kampala and Harare during pregnancy and in the subsequent two years.",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To compare birth outcomes, hospital admissions and mortality amongst HIV-1 seropositive and HIV-1 seronegative pregnant women in Kampala, Uganda and Harare, Zimbabwe. DESIGN: In Kampala and Harare about 400 HIV-1 seropositive and 400 HIV-1 seronegative pregnant women were recruited at initial visit for antenatal care into a prospective study and followed for two years after delivery. The women were classified as HIV-1 seropositive at recruitment if initial and second ELISA tests were positive and confirmed by Western Blot assay. Data on demographic, reproductive, contraceptive and medical histories were obtained using a comprehensive questionnaire at entry, 32 and 36 weeks gestation, at delivery and at six, 12, and 24 months post delivery. In addition, a physical examination and various blood tests were performed at each antenatal and post natal visit. RESULTS: During the two years after delivery, HIV-1 seropositive women had higher hospital admission and death rates than HIV-1 seronegative women. HIV-1 seropositive mothers had a two-fold increase in risk of being admitted to hospital (Kampala: RR = 2.09; 95{\%} CI = 0.95 to 4.59; Harare: RR = 1.98; 95{\%} CI = 1.13 to 3.45). In the six weeks after delivery eight deaths occurred, six of which were among HIV-1 seropositive women and in the period from six weeks to two years after delivery, 53 deaths occurred, 51 of which were among HIV-1 seropositive women (Kampala: RR = 17.7; 95{\%} CI = 4.3 to 73.2; Harare: RR = 10.0; 95{\%} CI = 2.3 to 43.1). However, there was no difference in hospital admission rates between HIV-1 seropositive and seronegative women during pregnancy itself and there was only one death during that period (in a HIV-1 seronegative woman). There was no difference in the frequency of complications of delivery between HIV-1 seropositive and HIV-1 seronegative women and the outcome of births were also similar. CONCLUSIONS: A significant number of HIV-1 positive pregnant women presented at both Harare and Kampala although there was no difference in the number of hospital admissions or mortality between HIV-1 seropositive and HIV-1 seronegative women during pregnancy. Although there were no differences in complications during pregnancy or outcome at delivery, in the two years after delivery, HIV-1 seropositive women in both centres were at increased risk of being admitted to hospital and of dying.",
author = "Mbizvo, {M. T.} and Mmiro, {F. A.} and J. Kasule and D. Bagenda and K. Mahomed and K. Nathoo and F. Mirembe and R. Choto and C. Nakabiito and Ndugwa, {C. M.} and O. Meirik",
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T1 - Morbidity and mortality patterns in HIV-1 seropositive/ seronegative women in Kampala and Harare during pregnancy and in the subsequent two years.

AU - Mbizvo, M. T.

AU - Mmiro, F. A.

AU - Kasule, J.

AU - Bagenda, D.

AU - Mahomed, K.

AU - Nathoo, K.

AU - Mirembe, F.

AU - Choto, R.

AU - Nakabiito, C.

AU - Ndugwa, C. M.

AU - Meirik, O.

PY - 2005/1/1

Y1 - 2005/1/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To compare birth outcomes, hospital admissions and mortality amongst HIV-1 seropositive and HIV-1 seronegative pregnant women in Kampala, Uganda and Harare, Zimbabwe. DESIGN: In Kampala and Harare about 400 HIV-1 seropositive and 400 HIV-1 seronegative pregnant women were recruited at initial visit for antenatal care into a prospective study and followed for two years after delivery. The women were classified as HIV-1 seropositive at recruitment if initial and second ELISA tests were positive and confirmed by Western Blot assay. Data on demographic, reproductive, contraceptive and medical histories were obtained using a comprehensive questionnaire at entry, 32 and 36 weeks gestation, at delivery and at six, 12, and 24 months post delivery. In addition, a physical examination and various blood tests were performed at each antenatal and post natal visit. RESULTS: During the two years after delivery, HIV-1 seropositive women had higher hospital admission and death rates than HIV-1 seronegative women. HIV-1 seropositive mothers had a two-fold increase in risk of being admitted to hospital (Kampala: RR = 2.09; 95% CI = 0.95 to 4.59; Harare: RR = 1.98; 95% CI = 1.13 to 3.45). In the six weeks after delivery eight deaths occurred, six of which were among HIV-1 seropositive women and in the period from six weeks to two years after delivery, 53 deaths occurred, 51 of which were among HIV-1 seropositive women (Kampala: RR = 17.7; 95% CI = 4.3 to 73.2; Harare: RR = 10.0; 95% CI = 2.3 to 43.1). However, there was no difference in hospital admission rates between HIV-1 seropositive and seronegative women during pregnancy itself and there was only one death during that period (in a HIV-1 seronegative woman). There was no difference in the frequency of complications of delivery between HIV-1 seropositive and HIV-1 seronegative women and the outcome of births were also similar. CONCLUSIONS: A significant number of HIV-1 positive pregnant women presented at both Harare and Kampala although there was no difference in the number of hospital admissions or mortality between HIV-1 seropositive and HIV-1 seronegative women during pregnancy. Although there were no differences in complications during pregnancy or outcome at delivery, in the two years after delivery, HIV-1 seropositive women in both centres were at increased risk of being admitted to hospital and of dying.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To compare birth outcomes, hospital admissions and mortality amongst HIV-1 seropositive and HIV-1 seronegative pregnant women in Kampala, Uganda and Harare, Zimbabwe. DESIGN: In Kampala and Harare about 400 HIV-1 seropositive and 400 HIV-1 seronegative pregnant women were recruited at initial visit for antenatal care into a prospective study and followed for two years after delivery. The women were classified as HIV-1 seropositive at recruitment if initial and second ELISA tests were positive and confirmed by Western Blot assay. Data on demographic, reproductive, contraceptive and medical histories were obtained using a comprehensive questionnaire at entry, 32 and 36 weeks gestation, at delivery and at six, 12, and 24 months post delivery. In addition, a physical examination and various blood tests were performed at each antenatal and post natal visit. RESULTS: During the two years after delivery, HIV-1 seropositive women had higher hospital admission and death rates than HIV-1 seronegative women. HIV-1 seropositive mothers had a two-fold increase in risk of being admitted to hospital (Kampala: RR = 2.09; 95% CI = 0.95 to 4.59; Harare: RR = 1.98; 95% CI = 1.13 to 3.45). In the six weeks after delivery eight deaths occurred, six of which were among HIV-1 seropositive women and in the period from six weeks to two years after delivery, 53 deaths occurred, 51 of which were among HIV-1 seropositive women (Kampala: RR = 17.7; 95% CI = 4.3 to 73.2; Harare: RR = 10.0; 95% CI = 2.3 to 43.1). However, there was no difference in hospital admission rates between HIV-1 seropositive and seronegative women during pregnancy itself and there was only one death during that period (in a HIV-1 seronegative woman). There was no difference in the frequency of complications of delivery between HIV-1 seropositive and HIV-1 seronegative women and the outcome of births were also similar. CONCLUSIONS: A significant number of HIV-1 positive pregnant women presented at both Harare and Kampala although there was no difference in the number of hospital admissions or mortality between HIV-1 seropositive and HIV-1 seronegative women during pregnancy. Although there were no differences in complications during pregnancy or outcome at delivery, in the two years after delivery, HIV-1 seropositive women in both centres were at increased risk of being admitted to hospital and of dying.

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