Monoclonal Antibodies to a Glycolipid Antigen on Human Neuroblastoma Cells1

Nai Kong V. Cheung, Ulla M. Saarinen, John E. Neely, Bonnie Landmeier, Duffy Donovan, Peter Felix Coccia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

257 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using a somatic cell hybridization technique, four murine monoclonal antibodies (three immunoglobulin in and one immunoglobulin G3) were produced against a human neuroblastoma cell surface glycolipid antigen. They reacted strongly with all human neuroblastoma tumor-containing specimens and six of eight human neuroblastoma cell lines. More than 98% of each neuroblastoma cell population possessed this surface antigen, and in the presence of complement, 100% of them were killed. While melanoma and osteogenic sarcoma carried this antigen, leukemia and most Ewing's and Wilms' tumors did not. There was no cross-reaction with 30 normal or remission bone marrow samples and none with normal human tissues other than neurons in vitro. This antigen was neuraminidase sensitive, separable on thin-layer chromatogram, and did not modulate after combining with the monoclonal antibodies. These antibodies could detect less than 0.1% tumor cells deliberately seeded in the bone marrow samples. Because of their unique properties, these monoclonal antibodies may have diagnostic and therapeutic potentials.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2642-2649
Number of pages8
JournalCancer Research
Volume45
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 1 1985

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Glycolipids
Neuroblastoma
Monoclonal Antibodies
Antigens
Surface Antigens
Immunoglobulins
Bone Marrow
Ewing's Sarcoma
Wilms Tumor
Cross Reactions
Neuraminidase
Osteosarcoma
Melanoma
Neoplasms
Leukemia
Neurons
Cell Line
Antibodies
Population
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Cheung, N. K. V., Saarinen, U. M., Neely, J. E., Landmeier, B., Donovan, D., & Coccia, P. F. (1985). Monoclonal Antibodies to a Glycolipid Antigen on Human Neuroblastoma Cells1. Cancer Research, 45(6), 2642-2649.

Monoclonal Antibodies to a Glycolipid Antigen on Human Neuroblastoma Cells1. / Cheung, Nai Kong V.; Saarinen, Ulla M.; Neely, John E.; Landmeier, Bonnie; Donovan, Duffy; Coccia, Peter Felix.

In: Cancer Research, Vol. 45, No. 6, 01.06.1985, p. 2642-2649.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cheung, NKV, Saarinen, UM, Neely, JE, Landmeier, B, Donovan, D & Coccia, PF 1985, 'Monoclonal Antibodies to a Glycolipid Antigen on Human Neuroblastoma Cells1', Cancer Research, vol. 45, no. 6, pp. 2642-2649.
Cheung NKV, Saarinen UM, Neely JE, Landmeier B, Donovan D, Coccia PF. Monoclonal Antibodies to a Glycolipid Antigen on Human Neuroblastoma Cells1. Cancer Research. 1985 Jun 1;45(6):2642-2649.
Cheung, Nai Kong V. ; Saarinen, Ulla M. ; Neely, John E. ; Landmeier, Bonnie ; Donovan, Duffy ; Coccia, Peter Felix. / Monoclonal Antibodies to a Glycolipid Antigen on Human Neuroblastoma Cells1. In: Cancer Research. 1985 ; Vol. 45, No. 6. pp. 2642-2649.
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