Monitoring organic thin film growth in aqueous solution in-situ with a combined Quartz Crystal Microbalance and ellipsometry

A. Sarkar, T. Viitala, T. Hofrnann, T. E. Tiwald, J. A. Woollam, A. Kjerstad, B. Laderian, M. Schubert

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Measuring thin films in aqueous environments poses a challenge because they may have an affinity for water (e.g. hydrogels) while adsorbed on a substrate. Typically, either the optical ellipsometry technique or the electromechanical Quartz Crystal Microbalance techniques are used to study thin films in-situ in aqueous environments. An ellipsometer measures the change in elliptically polarized light whereas the Quartz Crystal Microbalance utilizes the piezoelectric properties of an AT cut quartz crystal to measure properties of thin films. However, each technique has its limitations. The ellipsometer has the inherent limitation of coupling thickness of films of the order of a few nm with the film index of refraction. Commonly, the refractive index of the material is derived from ex-situ measurements performed on the bulk material. The Quartz Crystal Microbalance has the limitation that the density and the thickness of a film are coupled. Thus a reasonable assumption for the density must be made in order to determine the thickness. The ellipsometer can determine the actual amount of polymer present in a film. When measuring in-situ, an ellipsometer does not distinguish between water molecules attached to polymers comprising the film and the water in the ambient. However, the Quartz Crystal Microbalance measures the total mass attached to a substrate, i.e. both the polymer and the water molecules attached to it. Thus by combining the two instruments and correlating the thickness determined by each instrument, one can find the film porosity. We introduce a porosity parameter to characterize surfaces in aqueous environments. Our findings on formation of synperonic film on hydrophobic gold surface in aqueous environment are presented and discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationIn-Situ Studies Across Spatial and Temporal Scales for Nanoscience and Technology
Pages53-59
Number of pages7
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008
Event2008 MRS Fall Meeting - Boston, MA, United States
Duration: Dec 1 2008Dec 4 2008

Publication series

NameMaterials Research Society Symposium Proceedings
Volume1146
ISSN (Print)0272-9172

Other

Other2008 MRS Fall Meeting
CountryUnited States
CityBoston, MA
Period12/1/0812/4/08

Fingerprint

Quartz crystal microbalances
Ellipsometry
Film growth
quartz crystals
microbalances
ellipsometry
ellipsometers
aqueous solutions
Thin films
Monitoring
thin films
Polymers
Water
water
polymers
Porosity
porosity
Molecules
Quartz
Hydrogels

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Sarkar, A., Viitala, T., Hofrnann, T., Tiwald, T. E., Woollam, J. A., Kjerstad, A., ... Schubert, M. (2008). Monitoring organic thin film growth in aqueous solution in-situ with a combined Quartz Crystal Microbalance and ellipsometry. In In-Situ Studies Across Spatial and Temporal Scales for Nanoscience and Technology (pp. 53-59). (Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings; Vol. 1146).

Monitoring organic thin film growth in aqueous solution in-situ with a combined Quartz Crystal Microbalance and ellipsometry. / Sarkar, A.; Viitala, T.; Hofrnann, T.; Tiwald, T. E.; Woollam, J. A.; Kjerstad, A.; Laderian, B.; Schubert, M.

In-Situ Studies Across Spatial and Temporal Scales for Nanoscience and Technology. 2008. p. 53-59 (Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings; Vol. 1146).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Sarkar, A, Viitala, T, Hofrnann, T, Tiwald, TE, Woollam, JA, Kjerstad, A, Laderian, B & Schubert, M 2008, Monitoring organic thin film growth in aqueous solution in-situ with a combined Quartz Crystal Microbalance and ellipsometry. in In-Situ Studies Across Spatial and Temporal Scales for Nanoscience and Technology. Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings, vol. 1146, pp. 53-59, 2008 MRS Fall Meeting, Boston, MA, United States, 12/1/08.
Sarkar A, Viitala T, Hofrnann T, Tiwald TE, Woollam JA, Kjerstad A et al. Monitoring organic thin film growth in aqueous solution in-situ with a combined Quartz Crystal Microbalance and ellipsometry. In In-Situ Studies Across Spatial and Temporal Scales for Nanoscience and Technology. 2008. p. 53-59. (Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings).
Sarkar, A. ; Viitala, T. ; Hofrnann, T. ; Tiwald, T. E. ; Woollam, J. A. ; Kjerstad, A. ; Laderian, B. ; Schubert, M. / Monitoring organic thin film growth in aqueous solution in-situ with a combined Quartz Crystal Microbalance and ellipsometry. In-Situ Studies Across Spatial and Temporal Scales for Nanoscience and Technology. 2008. pp. 53-59 (Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings).
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