Monitoring of Ebola virus Makona evolution through establishment of advanced genomic capability in Liberia

US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases and National Institutes of Health/Integrated Research Facility-Frederick Ebola Response Team 2014-2015

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To support Liberia’s response to the ongoing Ebola virus (EBOV) disease epidemic in Western Africa, we established in-country advanced genomic capabilities to monitor EBOV evolution. Twenty-five EBOV genomes were sequenced at the Liberian Institute for Biomedical Research, which provided an in-depth view of EBOV diversity in Liberia during September 2014–February 2015. These sequences were consistent with a single virus introduction to Liberia; however, shared ancestry with isolates from Mali indicated at least 1 additional instance of movement into or out of Liberia. The pace of change is generally consistent with previous estimates of mutation rate. We observed 23 nonsynonymous mutations and 1 nonsense mutation. Six of these changes are within known binding sites for sequence-based EBOV medical countermeasures; however, the diagnostic and therapeutic impact of EBOV evolution within Liberia appears to be low.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1135-1143
Number of pages9
JournalEmerging infectious diseases
Volume21
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Liberia
Ebolavirus
Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever
Mali
Western Africa
Nonsense Codon
Mutation Rate
Biomedical Research
Binding Sites
Genome
Viruses
Mutation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases and National Institutes of Health/Integrated Research Facility-Frederick Ebola Response Team 2014-2015 (2015). Monitoring of Ebola virus Makona evolution through establishment of advanced genomic capability in Liberia. Emerging infectious diseases, 21(7), 1135-1143. https://doi.org/10.3201/eid2107.150522

Monitoring of Ebola virus Makona evolution through establishment of advanced genomic capability in Liberia. / US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases and National Institutes of Health/Integrated Research Facility-Frederick Ebola Response Team 2014-2015.

In: Emerging infectious diseases, Vol. 21, No. 7, 01.01.2015, p. 1135-1143.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases and National Institutes of Health/Integrated Research Facility-Frederick Ebola Response Team 2014-2015 2015, 'Monitoring of Ebola virus Makona evolution through establishment of advanced genomic capability in Liberia', Emerging infectious diseases, vol. 21, no. 7, pp. 1135-1143. https://doi.org/10.3201/eid2107.150522
US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases and National Institutes of Health/Integrated Research Facility-Frederick Ebola Response Team 2014-2015. Monitoring of Ebola virus Makona evolution through establishment of advanced genomic capability in Liberia. Emerging infectious diseases. 2015 Jan 1;21(7):1135-1143. https://doi.org/10.3201/eid2107.150522
US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases and National Institutes of Health/Integrated Research Facility-Frederick Ebola Response Team 2014-2015. / Monitoring of Ebola virus Makona evolution through establishment of advanced genomic capability in Liberia. In: Emerging infectious diseases. 2015 ; Vol. 21, No. 7. pp. 1135-1143.
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