Modulation of emotion by cognition and cognition by emotion

Karina Blair, B. W. Smith, D. G.V. Mitchell, J. Morton, M. Vythilingam, L. Pessoa, D. Fridberg, A. Zametkin, D. Sturman, E. E. Nelson, W. C. Drevets, D. S. Pine, A. Martin, Robert James Blair

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

242 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, we examined the impact of goal-directed processing on the response to emotional pictures and the impact of emotional pictures on goal-directed processing. Subjects (N = 22) viewed neutral or emotional pictures in the presence or absence of a demanding cognitive task. Goal-directed processing disrupted the BOLD response to emotional pictures. In particular, the BOLD response within bilateral amygdala and inferior frontal gyrus decreased during concurrent task performance. Moreover, the presence of both positive and negative distractors disrupted task performance, with reaction times increasing for emotional relative to neutral distractors. Moreover, in line with the suggestion of the importance of lateral frontal regions in emotional regulation [Ochsner, K. N., Ray, R. D., Cooper, J. C., Robertson, E. R., Chopra, S., Gabrieli, J. D., et al. (2004). For better or for worse: neural systems supporting the cognitive down-and up-regulation of negative emotion. NeuroImage, 23(2), 483-499], connectivity analysis revealed positive connectivity between lateral superior frontal cortex and regions of middle frontal cortex previously implicated in emotional suppression [Beauregard, M., Levesque, J., and Bourgouin, P. (2001). Neural correlates of conscious self-regulation of emotion. J. Neurosci., 21 (18), RC165.; Levesque, J., Eugene, F., Joanette, Y., Paquette, V., Mensour, B., Beaudoin, G., et al. (2003). Neural circuitry underlying voluntary suppression of sadness. Biol. Psychiatry, 53 (6), 502-510.; Ohira, H., Nomura, M., Ichikawa, N., Isowa, T., Iidaka, T., Sato, A., et al. (2006). Association of neural and physiological responses during voluntary emotion suppression. NeuroImage, 29 (3), 721-733] and negative connectivity with bilateral amygdala. These data suggest that processes involved in emotional regulation are recruited during task performance in the context of emotional distractors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)430-440
Number of pages11
JournalNeuroImage
Volume35
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2007

Fingerprint

Task Performance and Analysis
Cognition
Emotions
Frontal Lobe
Amygdala
Prefrontal Cortex
Reaction Time
Psychiatry
Up-Regulation
Down-Regulation

Keywords

  • Attention
  • Emotion
  • Emotional interference
  • Stroop interference
  • fMRI

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

Blair, K., Smith, B. W., Mitchell, D. G. V., Morton, J., Vythilingam, M., Pessoa, L., ... Blair, R. J. (2007). Modulation of emotion by cognition and cognition by emotion. NeuroImage, 35(1), 430-440. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2006.11.048

Modulation of emotion by cognition and cognition by emotion. / Blair, Karina; Smith, B. W.; Mitchell, D. G.V.; Morton, J.; Vythilingam, M.; Pessoa, L.; Fridberg, D.; Zametkin, A.; Sturman, D.; Nelson, E. E.; Drevets, W. C.; Pine, D. S.; Martin, A.; Blair, Robert James.

In: NeuroImage, Vol. 35, No. 1, 01.03.2007, p. 430-440.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Blair, K, Smith, BW, Mitchell, DGV, Morton, J, Vythilingam, M, Pessoa, L, Fridberg, D, Zametkin, A, Sturman, D, Nelson, EE, Drevets, WC, Pine, DS, Martin, A & Blair, RJ 2007, 'Modulation of emotion by cognition and cognition by emotion', NeuroImage, vol. 35, no. 1, pp. 430-440. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2006.11.048
Blair K, Smith BW, Mitchell DGV, Morton J, Vythilingam M, Pessoa L et al. Modulation of emotion by cognition and cognition by emotion. NeuroImage. 2007 Mar 1;35(1):430-440. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2006.11.048
Blair, Karina ; Smith, B. W. ; Mitchell, D. G.V. ; Morton, J. ; Vythilingam, M. ; Pessoa, L. ; Fridberg, D. ; Zametkin, A. ; Sturman, D. ; Nelson, E. E. ; Drevets, W. C. ; Pine, D. S. ; Martin, A. ; Blair, Robert James. / Modulation of emotion by cognition and cognition by emotion. In: NeuroImage. 2007 ; Vol. 35, No. 1. pp. 430-440.
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