Modular wireless wheeled in vivo surgical robots

Stephen R. Platt, Jeff A. Hawks, Mark E. Rentschler, Lee Redden, Shane M Farritor, Dmitry Oleynikov

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Minimally invasive abdominal surgery (laparoscopy) results in superior patient outcomes as measured by less painful recovery and an earlier return to functional health compared to conventional open surgery. However, the difficulty of manipulating traditional laparoscopic tools from outside the patient's body generally limits these benefits to patients undergoing procedures with relatively low complexity. The use of miniature in vivo robots that fit entirely inside the peritoneal cavity represents a novel approach to laparoscopic surgery. Our previous work has demonstrated that mobile and fixedbased in vivo robots can successfully operate within the abdominal cavity and provide surgical vision and task assistance. All of these robots used tethers for power and data transmission. This paper describes recent work focused on developing a modular wireless mobile platform that can be used for in vivo sensing and manipulation applications. The robot base can accommodate a variety of payloads. Details of the designs and results of ex vivo and in vivo tests of robots with biopsy grasper and physiological sensor payloads are presented. These types of self-contained surgical devices are much more transportable and much lower in cost than current robotic surgical assistants. These attributes could ultimately allow such devices to be carried and deployed by non-medical personnel at the site of an injury. A remotely located surgeon could then use these robots to provide critical first response medical intervention irrespective of the location of the patient.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationASME 2008 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE2008
Pages727-736
Number of pages10
EditionPARTS A AND B
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008
EventASME 2008 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE2008 - Brooklyn, NY, United States
Duration: Aug 3 2008Aug 6 2008

Publication series

NameProceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference
NumberPARTS A AND B
Volume2

Conference

ConferenceASME 2008 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE2008
CountryUnited States
CityBrooklyn, NY
Period8/3/088/6/08

Fingerprint

Robot
Robots
Surgery
Cavity
Laparoscopy
Minimally Invasive Surgery
Biopsy
Data Transmission
Power transmission
Data communication systems
Low Complexity
Robotic surgery
Robotics
Manipulation
Health
Sensing
Recovery
Attribute
Personnel
Sensor

Keywords

  • In vivo
  • Laparoscopy
  • Mobile
  • Modular
  • Sensors
  • Surgical robots
  • Wireless

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design

Cite this

Platt, S. R., Hawks, J. A., Rentschler, M. E., Redden, L., Farritor, S. M., & Oleynikov, D. (2008). Modular wireless wheeled in vivo surgical robots. In ASME 2008 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE2008 (PARTS A AND B ed., pp. 727-736). (Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference; Vol. 2, No. PARTS A AND B). https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2008-49157

Modular wireless wheeled in vivo surgical robots. / Platt, Stephen R.; Hawks, Jeff A.; Rentschler, Mark E.; Redden, Lee; Farritor, Shane M; Oleynikov, Dmitry.

ASME 2008 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE2008. PARTS A AND B. ed. 2008. p. 727-736 (Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference; Vol. 2, No. PARTS A AND B).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Platt, SR, Hawks, JA, Rentschler, ME, Redden, L, Farritor, SM & Oleynikov, D 2008, Modular wireless wheeled in vivo surgical robots. in ASME 2008 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE2008. PARTS A AND B edn, Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference, no. PARTS A AND B, vol. 2, pp. 727-736, ASME 2008 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE2008, Brooklyn, NY, United States, 8/3/08. https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2008-49157
Platt SR, Hawks JA, Rentschler ME, Redden L, Farritor SM, Oleynikov D. Modular wireless wheeled in vivo surgical robots. In ASME 2008 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE2008. PARTS A AND B ed. 2008. p. 727-736. (Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference; PARTS A AND B). https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2008-49157
Platt, Stephen R. ; Hawks, Jeff A. ; Rentschler, Mark E. ; Redden, Lee ; Farritor, Shane M ; Oleynikov, Dmitry. / Modular wireless wheeled in vivo surgical robots. ASME 2008 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE2008. PARTS A AND B. ed. 2008. pp. 727-736 (Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference; PARTS A AND B).
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