Modification of impulsivity: Implications for improved efficiency in learning for exceptional children

Gail Digate, Michael H. Epstein, Douglas Cullinan, Harvey N. Switzky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent research on cognitive tempo, specifically the reflection-impulsivity dimension, has indicated that an impulsive problem-solving approach is not conducive to the development of adaptive academic and social skills. Since many exceptional children are described as cognitively impulsive, knowledge of the techniques to attenuate impulsivity is important to the teachers of such children. Experimental modification procedures, such as required delay, direct instruction, self-verbalization, differentiation training, modeling, and reinforcement, are reviewed and their respective teaching implications identified. While specific teaching strategies are noted, the authors caution that applied classroom research is necessary in order to ascertain which techniques are valid for classroom use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)459-468
Number of pages10
JournalThe Journal of Special Education
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1978

Fingerprint

Exceptional Child
Impulsive Behavior
Teaching
Learning
Efficiency
efficiency
classroom
teaching strategy
Research
reinforcement
learning
instruction
teacher

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Modification of impulsivity : Implications for improved efficiency in learning for exceptional children. / Digate, Gail; Epstein, Michael H.; Cullinan, Douglas; Switzky, Harvey N.

In: The Journal of Special Education, Vol. 12, No. 4, 12.1978, p. 459-468.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Digate, Gail ; Epstein, Michael H. ; Cullinan, Douglas ; Switzky, Harvey N. / Modification of impulsivity : Implications for improved efficiency in learning for exceptional children. In: The Journal of Special Education. 1978 ; Vol. 12, No. 4. pp. 459-468.
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