Models of pediatric palliative oncology outpatient care-benefits, challenges, and opportunities

Katharine E. Brock, Jennifer M. Snaman, Erica C. Kaye, Kimberly A. Bower, Meaghann S Weaver, Justin N. Baker, Joanne Wolfe, Christina Ullrich

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

PURPOSE Although the bulk of current pediatric palliative care (PPC) services are concentrated in inpatient settings, the vast majority of clinical care, symptom assessment and management, decision-making, and advance care planning occurs in the outpatient and home settings. As integrated PPC/pediatric oncology becomes the standard of care, novel pediatric palliative oncology (PPO) outpatient models are emerging. The optimal PPO model is unknown and likely varies on the basis of institutional culture, resources, space, and personnel. METHODS We review five institutions' unique outpatient PPO clinical models with their respective benefits and challenges. This review offers pragmatic guidance regarding PPO clinic development, implementation, and resource allocation. RESULTS Specific examples include a floating clinic model, embedded disease-specific PPC experts, embedded consultative or trigger-based supportive care clinics, and telehealth clinics. CONCLUSION Organizations that have overcome personnel, funding, and logistical challenges can serve as role models for centers developing PPO clinic models. In the absence of a one-size-fits-all model, pediatric oncology and PPC groups can select, tailor, and implement the model that best suits their respective personnel, needs, and capacities. Emerging PPO clinics must balance the challenges and opportunities unique to their organization, with the goal of providing high-quality PPC for children with cancer and their families.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)476-487
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of oncology practice
Volume15
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Ambulatory Care
Pediatrics
Palliative Care
Outpatients
Advance Care Planning
Organizations
Symptom Assessment
Medical Oncology
Resource Allocation
Telemedicine
Standard of Care
Inpatients
Decision Making

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Oncology(nursing)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Models of pediatric palliative oncology outpatient care-benefits, challenges, and opportunities. / Brock, Katharine E.; Snaman, Jennifer M.; Kaye, Erica C.; Bower, Kimberly A.; Weaver, Meaghann S; Baker, Justin N.; Wolfe, Joanne; Ullrich, Christina.

In: Journal of oncology practice, Vol. 15, No. 9, 01.01.2019, p. 476-487.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Brock, KE, Snaman, JM, Kaye, EC, Bower, KA, Weaver, MS, Baker, JN, Wolfe, J & Ullrich, C 2019, 'Models of pediatric palliative oncology outpatient care-benefits, challenges, and opportunities', Journal of oncology practice, vol. 15, no. 9, pp. 476-487. https://doi.org/10.1200/JOP.19.00100
Brock, Katharine E. ; Snaman, Jennifer M. ; Kaye, Erica C. ; Bower, Kimberly A. ; Weaver, Meaghann S ; Baker, Justin N. ; Wolfe, Joanne ; Ullrich, Christina. / Models of pediatric palliative oncology outpatient care-benefits, challenges, and opportunities. In: Journal of oncology practice. 2019 ; Vol. 15, No. 9. pp. 476-487.
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